Tag Archives: Residencies

Artist Residencies Evaluation.

Finally someone took on the titanic task of evaluating Artist Residencies. Check it out:

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/best-artist-residencies-europe-1060478

Advertisements

The Luminary Residency Program. Deadline: Sept. 15, 2017

Applications Open for 2018 Residencies

As a leading artist-run and artist-centric space, The Luminary supports exceptional ideas and initiatives by providing dedicated time, considered collaborations and a supportive working environment through our Residency Program. The program is open to all artists, performers, curators and critics, but uniquely supports the research, development and presentation of work that utilizes innovative forms and unconventional structures such as alternative spaces and economies, publications and writing, archives, collaborations, artist-led projects and experimental institutional practices.

Though open to all applicants, particular attention for 2018 will be given to the theme of New Constitutions: Commoning the Institution. For the year, we invite proposals that rethink the relationship between the individual and the institution, asking questions such as: How does an artist, art writer, performer or curator reshape an institution’s practice, its publics, or its politics? How do economies of care and collaboration reshape the institution? How do we work past the individual economies of the art world and advance new conceptions of the commons? Participants may propose to alter our administrative procedures or physical environment; propose new uses of space or initiate other spaces within our own; rework our public relations or intervene within our online presence; or thoroughly reimagine how we relate with artists and circulate within the art world.

In 2018, The Luminary will accept twelve residents in three phases: April and May; June and July; and September and October. Residencies are two weeks up to six weeks in duration and each resident will receive stipends, spacious private accommodations, shared studio space, and connections with local artists, curators and galleries. Each resident is expected to work towards an exhibition, publication, institutional collaboration or other public program during their residency.

Applications are due September 15th, 2017 for residencies taking place throughout 2018.

To apply, please fill out the online application.

For more information, visit our website or email us at info@theluminaryarts.com.

Article on DIY residencies (Repost from the Guardian)

DIY residencies: a career in the arts on your own terms

From 24-hour plays to co-op leasing, US artists are ditching traditional residencies in favour of working on their own terms
Last week, US rail company Amtrak officially began offering writing residencies on its trains after writers mounted a lively social media campaign sparked by an interview with author Alexander Chee, in which he floated the idea. The announcement attracted headlines around the world and put a mainstream spotlight like never before on the role that residency programs can play in fostering the development of both artists and their art.

At the same time, however, the fact that so many writers were clamouring for Amtrak to launch the programme underscored that formal residencies are often out of reach for many artists. They can be highly competitive and are often too lengthy or too far away to be affordable for the many artists who rely on day jobs to make ends meet.

It is not surprising then that more and more artists are taking matters into their own hands by organising do-it-yourself residencies. These pioneers are establishing new models for residencies by experimenting with alternative approaches to funding, space and time, while still creating an experience that allows them and other artists to break away from the daily grind in order to explore and develop ideas, collaborate and network with other artists, and make art. Some of the innovative ideas and solutions being tested include:

Co-op leasing

To avoid the huge financial outlay of owning a facility to host a residency, the Austin-based Rubber Repertory theatre used a co-op financial model to help cover the cost of the lease on a church space for their own long-term placement. It supplemented its costs by offering affordable short-term residencies ($50 for a week stay) to more than 80 artists from around the world over the course of a year.

Theatre company co-founder Josh Meyer recently told Fast Company that anyone could easily copy their model: “The artists don’t need a lot from us. What we’re really giving them is the time and the space. Anyone with a year to do this could probably start their own artist colony.”

Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding sites such as IndieGoGo, RocketHub, and Kickstarter are powerful new tools that artists can use to both fundraise for a residency program and to engage a broad base of project supporters. In fact, Rubber Repertory raised over $9,000 via crowdfunding campaign to cover a portion of rent and utilities on the church space it used for its residency.

The Indy Convergence, founded by a trio of artist entrepreneurs, including an actor, dancer and designer, has also successfully used crowdfunding to fund its pop-up residency – a two-week summer gathering of professional artists from across the US who collaborate on cross-disciplinary projects.

The 24-hour residency

One way to make costs more manageable is to significantly limit the length of the traditional residency experience. There are many examples of creative professionals from diverse disciplines who have come together to collaborate and create an original artwork within a restricted timeframe, such as 24 Hour Plays, the 48 Hour Film Project and twenty-four magazine.

By limiting their lengths, these projects make it easier for more artists with day jobs to participate and, more importantly, maximise the potency and creative energy of the artists’ time together. The accelerated creative process allows ideas to be explored and processed overnight, cultivates new creative relationships in real-time, and leaves participants with a renewed sense of motivation, self-confidence and purpose.

Earned revenue

Detroit-based choreographer and dancer Kristi Faulkner worked out a deal to use under-utilised space at Michigan State University for her DIY residency. To cover the additional costs of a three-artist residency, she ran classes for the public to generate the needed funds. She invited two other collaborators from different disciplines – artists she wanted residency time to create new work with – which resulted in a larger audience for the classes by attracting people passionate about different artforms.

As a variation on the idea, artists could approach local schools or colleges, which are vacated during the summer, or a holiday resort or campsite, which tend to be under-used in the winter, and offer their artistic expertise as a service.

A month-long residency in a cabin in the woods with complete privacy to focus on creative work will never be accessible or feasible for most artists. Thankfully, more and more artists are reimagining the traditional residency for a new generation of independent artists who are building and sustaining careers in the arts on their own terms.

Lisa Niedermeyer is a programme director at Fractured Atlas – follow the organisation on Twitter @FracturedAtlas

Repost from Guardian Culture Pros Network.

 

Residency Program, St. Louis, for early 2014. Deadline: June 30, 2013

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: The Luminary Residency Program – OpenAiR

This summer will start a very exciting new phase for The Luminary Center for the Arts. Re-launching in July 2013, The Luminary Residency Program will be comprised of four interrelated programs that will uniquely support the research, development and presentation of artistic and curatorial practices that utilize innovative forms and unconventional economic and academic structures.

OpenAiR
OpenAiR supports exceptional emerging artists and curators engaging the world of contemporary art and criticism by providing dedicated time and a supportive working environment. OpenAiR is open to all artistic and curatorial practices but uniquely supports the research, development and production of experimental projects that engage (but are not limited to) alternative spaces and models, archives, publications and writing, collaborations, artist-led projects and socially engaged practices.

Residents are provided well-equipped private studios, housing and modest stipends. Residencies are available year-round from one week up to three months and awarded in two sessions (Fall and Spring).

OpenAiR applications are due June 30th for our next Spring Session: January-June 2014.

To apply, please download the electronic application and email it with all supporting materials to residency@theluminaryarts.com <mailto:residency@theluminaryarts.com> . Please note there is a non-refundable $25 application fee.

Residency Program

The Luminary’s Residency Program supports exceptional emerging artists and curators by providing dedicated time and a supportive working environment including well-equipped private studios with 24 hour access and wireless internet, additional shared workspace, and access to AV equipment and woodshop. Starting July 2013, The Luminary will also offer onsite housing and award a number of stipends.

In addition to visual artists, The Luminary now accepts applications from emerging curators interested in engaging the world of contemporary art and criticism. The Luminary Residency Program for curators supports the research, development and production of experimental projects that engage (but are not limited to) alternative spaces and models, archives, publications and writing, collaborations, artist-led projects and socially engaged practices.

The Luminary offers residencies year-round from one week up to three months.
Applications are next due June 30th, 2013 for residencies starting January 2014 and after.

To apply, please download the following electronic application and email the form back with all supporting materials to residency@theluminaryarts.com.


Residency Program Application PDF

Please note there is a non-refundable $25 application fee.
Please submit your application fee via Paypal to residency@theluminaryarts.com
or mail to:

The Luminary Center for the Arts
2644 Cherokee Street
Saint Louis MO 63118

FAQs

What expectations does The Luminary have of their artists and curators in residence?
The Luminary Residency Program participants are expected to use the time and space awarded to them and be an engaged member of The Luminary community. Opportunities for public engagement are available and a small number, such as Open Studios and lectures, may be requested. Residents are also asked to donate work in proportion to the financial support received during their residency.
Does The Luminary offer stipends, housing or grants for travel to and from the residency?

The Luminary has an evolving but finite amount of support we can offer to residents each session. International applicants and those with significant need should apply early for their intended residency to allow ample time to arrange and assist with support. The Luminary Center for the Arts has launched a capital campaign to raise funds to purchase and renovate a 13,000 sq/ft complex to serve as its new home. Please note that due to this impending move we will be unable to offer residency housing until 2013 when new housing will be available on-site.

Does The Luminary accept applications from collaborative teams?
Yes, The Luminary does accept applications from collaborative teams. Applying collaborative teams are asked to submit individual resumes or CV.
Are students allowed to participate in the residency program?

Current students may not participate in the residency program but may apply for residencies that begin after their schooling is complete.
What is the community of St. Louis like?

St. Louis has an active arts community with many galleries, DIY spaces and free museums. The Luminary is located in an active urban environment with access to public transit, restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and public parks. The Luminary’s Residency Program always includes local artists and there are many options to get involved in the greater arts community. For a more in-depth view of the St. Louis art community please see Temporary Art Review’s St. Louis page: http://temporaryartreview.com/saintlouis
_
See: Current and Former Residents
Contact us at residency@theluminaryarts.com for more information.
The Residency Program is supported in part by The Trio Foundation of St. Louis.

International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP). Residencies for artists and curators, New York.

New York, ZDA
 

ISCP

residencies for artists and curators.

Artists and curators can apply for residencies at ISCP. There are two ways of applying, a partner application or a direct application.Residencies are between three and twelve months and are sponsored by governments, corporations, foundations, institutions, organizations, galleries and private patrons. Each artist or curator is provided with 24-hour access to their studio and wireless internet. In addition, all residents can use ISCP’s common areas. ISCP does not provide or arrange living accommodation, however, a number of partner sponsors, who send participants to ISCP each year, have a furnished apartment for residents. In addition, sponsors often give a stipend for accommodation, living expenses, travel and materials.Partner Application

ISCP collaborates with over forty partner governments, institutions and organizations to fund residency opportunities. Partner sponsors publicly call for applications for residencies at ISCP. Check our webside for a list of partner sponsors.

Direct Application

If you wish to apply directly to ISCP, please read the information below carefully:

Please email the application form and supporting materials to the e-mail address below. ISCP does not locate sponsors for direct applicants. Once accepted, artists and curators are responsible for securing funding. Please have a look at our previous sponsors for potential funding sources. When planning your residency, please bear in mind that residencies are scheduled approximately one year in advance. We are currently scheduling 2012. There is no deadline and the application review takes place once every two months.

The following steps must be taken in the order below before an applicant can be accepted into ISCP:

  1. Application is sent to ISCP
  2. ISCP’s panel reviews the application within two months
  3. If the application is successful, the applicant receives an acceptance letter
  4. Applicant has two years from the date of the acceptance letter to locate funding
  5. When funding has been secured by applicant, ISCP confirms directly with sponsor
  6. When sponsor has confirmed, ISCP staff and applicant schedule residency
  7. If necessary, applicant must apply for a US visa (see below)
  8. Applicant makes appointment with ISCP staff and arrives in New York

The program fee for 2011 is $19,570 to $21,630 per year or $1,630.83 to $1,802.50 per month. In addition, the applicant needs to calculate accommodation, living, travel and health insurance costs for the duration of their stay in New York.

Deadline: there is no deadline, the application review once a month
Contact:
International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP)
1040 Metropolitan Avenue, 3rd Fl.
NY 11211 Brooklyn
USA
fax: 718 387 2966
application@iscp-nyc.org
www.iscp-nyc.org

Residency Guide Europe (Spanish only, but VERY useful!)

The Spanish Ministry for Culture has published a very very helpful PDF document and online search machine for artists residencies in Europe. If you know a little Spanish and/or have a bit of common sense, you will find this resource enormously helpful!

The online version is available at http://artistasvisualesenred.org/localizador/index.html

while the full PDF is for download at http://www.mcu.es/principal/docs/novedades/2012/localizador_2012.pdf

Now, there is really no more excuse why you should not move your Fine Artists A.. to a residency!   😉

Includes exotic countries such as Armenia, Georgia and Cyprus!

Moritz