Tag Archives: Museum

Open Call: Finnish Museum of Photography’s Project Space. Deadline: May 8, 2016

OPEN CALL FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC AND VISUAL ARTISTS

Project Space at the Cable Factory in Helsinki, Finland, is an open-application exhibition space. The open call for next year’s exhibitions is now organized for the seventh time.

Photography professionals and students as well as visual artists making photographic art can apply. Applications can also be submitted in the name of workgroups.

The Project space is intended for exhibitions and projects that use photography or other lens-based media as tools for art or research. The space shows stimulating exhibitions by both fresh talents and more established artists. Applications can also be submitted for exhibition time for screenings, public talks and discussions.

http://www.valokuvataiteenmuseo.fi/en/component/content/article/11111

How to apply?

Application

This year the museum only accepts applications that consist of a single pdf file. However, if the exhibition includes video, you can add a link to it instead of sending the video file as an attachment.

The pdf should contain the following elements:

1) A cover page with the name of the applicant (and/or the workgroup), e-mail address and a phone number (country code included).

2) Application letter that gives brief but complete details of the proposed exhibition (max 2 x A4). The letter should involve information of who is/are the applicant/s, what kind of an exhibition you would like to have and, if possible, what kind of sections does the exhibition consist of. It is okay to not have an existing exhibition when applying – just be as precise as possible with your explanations of what kind of an exhibition you’re planning.

3) Include a portfolio containing photos of the works to be in the planned exhibition. Indicate each work’s year of completion, dimensions, mode of production etc., and include any information that will help give a picture of the exhibition as a whole. In case the works for the planned exhibition have not been produced yet, please send some reference material of your earlier works.

If you are planning to show moving image, please add a link where we can see the work.

4) Include your full contact details and your CV to your application. If the exhibition is produced by a group, please include everyone’s CVs.

Name the pdf file as “Projekti2017_YOURNAME”. The size of the pdf file should not exceed 10MB.

Applications for the year 2017 should be sent to finnishmuseumofphotography@gmail.com by 12PM on Sunday, May 8, 2016.

Please write Projekti2017 as the headline of the message.

We will send you a confirmation e-mail once we have received your application. Please contact museum’s curator Tiina Rauhala ( tiina.rauhala@fmp.fi ) if you have not heard back from us with a week from sending your application.

What the Museum provides for exhibitors?

The Museum provides exhibition space, free, for 7-8 weeks. Applicants can indicate a preferred exhibition period, but the Finnish Museum of Photography reserves the right to decide on the order of the exhibitions. There are five exhibition periods during the year 2017.

The Project space has a floor area of 50 m² and a ceiling 4.5 m high (see floor plan).

The Museum offers exhibition installers a fixed production grant of 400 euros. The Artist is responsible of other production costs. The Museum provides help with installation and dismantlement, exhibition supervision, and opening arrangements. The artist should be personally present during the construction and dismantling of the exhibition.

The Museum is responsible for exhibition lighting and cleanliness during the exhibition period. The Museum has a limited amount of technical equipment available for loan to artists. The Museum is not able to provide any audio or video equipment for the exhibitions.

The Museum provides insurance for the construction, dismantlement and exhibition periods. The Museum does not insure works during transportation.

The Museum provides publicity, publishes exhibition details and sends press releases and posts information on the Museum’s website and social media channels.

The Museum does not provide paper invitations or postage. Artists who make and post invitations at their own expense can use the museum’s geographic mailing list if they wish.

Exhibition installers are responsible for transportation of works and for their own travel costs.

 

projektin_pohja_mittoineen

472px_Projekti
Project space.

The decision-making process

The applications are reviewed by the Finnish Museum of Photography’s exhibition team: Chief Curator Anna-Kaisa Rastenberger and Curator Tiina Rauhala.

All applicants will be informed of the curators’ decision by e-mail by June 17, 2016. The selected projects will also be published on the museum’s website.

Further details

Send your application to:  finnishmuseumofphotography@gmail.com

Further exhibition details:
Curator Tiina Rauhala: +358 50 432 7562, tiina.rauhala@fmp.fi
Chief Curator Anna-Kaisa Rastenberger, +358-(0)50-518 7619, annara@fmp.fi

Deadline for applications is May 8, 2016.

Further details:
Curator Tiina Rauhala
tel. +358-(0)50432 7562,  tiina.rauhala@fmp.fi
Chief Curator Anna-Kaisa Rastenberger
tel. +358-(0)50-518 7619, anna-kaisa.rastenberger@fmp.fi

CURATORIAL PROGRAM CALL for South America. Deadline: Jan. 5, 2016

THE CURATORIAL PROGRAM FOR RESEARCH (CPR) is the core facilitator of an international network of curators, artists and institutions. Through open calls and full research scholarships, CPR has three goals: first, to enable a direct, in situ communication between international curators and local artists. Secondly, to promote equal access to knowledge. And third, to act as a platform for promotion and practice for the participating curators and hosts.

With a nomadic and intensive format, CPR promotes dialogue between international curators and local artistic scenes. The program was created by curators and for curators, and is a non-profit international organization based in Indianapolis, USA, with satellite locations in more than 12 cities throughout the world. Each satellite city develops its activities through partnerships with local institutions, designating a host curator for each case. CPR draws up an academic program, with specialized readings about art history and general knowledge, together with visits to museums and artist studios, and discussions with scholars and experts.

NEXT OPEN CALL CPR 2016: SOUTH AMERICA

 APPLICATION AVAILABLE – NOVEMBER 23, 2015

DEADLINE – JANUARY 5, 2016

APPLICATION GUIDELINES

Independent curators and those with institutional affiliations may apply. Applications from curators with 2+ years of professional experience will be considered. A jury comprised of CPR’s executive board as well as CPR local hosts will select the participants.

To be considered a candidate for the CPR 2016: South America, please submit a full application that contains the following:

• A completed application form (2 pages)

• A statement of up to 400 words. This statement should include your knowledge of the area to be visited as well as your expectations about how the Program will expand your existing body of work and/or enhance your professional development.

• A Curriculum Vitae (abridged to no more than 2 pages)

• US$ 25 application fee. Please, note that no application will be considered until the application fee is paid. 

To download the APPLICATION FORM please click here

To pay the APPLICATION FEE please click here

Call for Exhibition Proposals. Finnish Museum of Photography’s Project Space. Deadline: May 3, 2015

CALL FOR ARTISTS /
OPEN INVITATION TO PHOTOGRAPHIC AND OTHER VISUAL ARTISTS
THE FINNISH MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY’S PROJECT EXHIBITION SPACE

The Finnish Museum of Photography’s Project space at the Cable Factory (Helsinki, Finland) is an open-application exhibition space. The open call is now organized for the sixth time.

Applications are open to anyone worldwide – both professionals and students – making photographic art. Applications can also be submitted in the name of workgroups.
The Project space is intended for exhibitions and projects that use photography or other lens-based media as tools for art or research. The space shows stimulating exhibitions by both fresh talents and more mature artists. Applications can also be submitted for Project-space exhibition time for screenings, public talks and discussions.

Applications for the year 2016 should be sent by 12pm on the 3rd of May 2015.

Application has to follow the instructions.
You will find detailed instructions on the museum’s website:
http://www.valokuvataiteenmuseo.fi/en/component/content/article/11111

Further details:
Curator Tiina Rauhala
+358-(0)50432 7562  tiina.rauhala@fmp.fi

Chief Curator: Anna-Kaisa Rastenberger

www.valokuvataiteenmuseo.fi/en

Young Portfolio Acquisitions (Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts). Deadline: May 15, 2015

Save the date for the next Young Portfolio Acquisitions, of the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts, in Japan.

The next submission period is April 15 – May 15, 2015.
The selection panel: Daido Moriyama, Keizo Kitajima, Eikoh Hosoe
(Director of the Museum)

More info on the attached folder:

Young Portfolio Acquisitions (Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts). Deadline: May 15, 2015

and at:

Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts

407-0301山梨県北杜市高根町清里3545
3545 Kiyosato, Takane-cho, Hokuto-shi, Yamnashi 407-0301 Japan
Tel: 0551-48-5599  Fax: 0551-48-5445 Email: yamaji@kmopa.com
http://www.kmopa.com
http://www.facebook.com/kmopa
http://www.twitter.com/kmopa

OPEN CALL, FINNISH MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY. Deadline: May 9, 2014

 CALL FOR ARTISTS

OPEN INVITATION TO PHOTOGRAPHIC AND OTHER VISUAL ARTISTS
FINNISH MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY’S PROJECT EXHIBITION SPACE

The Finnish Museum of Photography’s Project space at the Cable Factory (Helsinki)is an open-application exhibition space. The open call is now organized for fifth time and for the time being the last time.

Applications are open to anyone worldwide – both professionals and students – making photographic art. Applications can also be submitted in the name of workgroups.
The Project space is intended for exhibitions and projects that use photography or other lens-based media as tools for art or research. The space shows stimulating exhibitions by both fresh talents and more mature artists. Applications can also be submitted for Project-space exhibition time for screenings, public talks and discussions.

Applications for year 2015 should arrive at the Finnish Museum of Photography by 18:00 on Friday 9.5.2014. A stamp of the same day is sufficient.

You will find detailed instructions and the floor plan of the Project space from museum’s website:
http://www.valokuvataiteenmuseo.fi/en/component/content/article/10908

Send your application to:
“Project space”
Finnish Museum of Photography
Tallberginkatu 1 C 85
00180 Helsinki

Applications can be delivered by hand to:
Finnish Museum of Photography
Tallberginkatu 1 G 1st floor
00180 Helsinki

Further exhibition details:
Curator Tiina Rauhala
+358-(0)50432 7562  tiina.rauhala@fmp.fi
Chief Curator Anna-Kaisa Rastenberger
+358-(0)50-518 7619, anna-kaisa.rastenberger@fmp.fi

http://www.valokuvataiteenmuseo.fi/en <http://www.valokuvataiteenmuseo.fi/en>

Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts’ “Young Portfolio” Section. Deadline: May 15, 2013

Guidelines of Submissions for the Young Portfolio 2013


Eligibility
Application Period
Rules and Conditions
Submitting prints
The Selection Committee

Prices
Exhibition
Application Fee
How to Apply
Registration and Payment Details

1) How to register on the Website
2) Payment of the Application Fee
How to bring or ship your work
Announcement of selections and returning work
Other points
For Submitting Applications and Further Information



Eligibility
Applicants must have been born after January 1, 1978 (i.e., must not be above 35 years of age); applications from photographers and artists who work in the medium of photography, regardless of gender, nationality or professional or amateur status, are welcome.

Application Period
Period for application via the Website and for receipt of submissions April 15 – May 15, 2013

Rules and Conditions
1. Submissions on CDs or other digital recording media will not be accepted. All submissions must be in the form of prints.
2. Previous publication of an image will not be a cause for disqualification.
3. Any theme or technique is acceptable. The images must, however, be of archival quality both in technique and materials, since they will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.
4. Each applicant may submit up to 50 images, whether single-image or multi-image works.
5. An applicant who has submitted work for previous years’ Young Portfolio is welcome to apply again, as long as the applicant is not above 35 years of age; previous selection of a work for purchase for the Young Portfolio collection will not be a cause for disqualification.

Submitting prints
1. Works must be 20 cm x 25 cm or larger but no larger than 1 meter on either dimension.
2. If the print you are submitting is not in the size planned for the finished print, please include a note indicating the intended finished print size. If the Museum decides to acquire that image, the photographer must bear the cost of producing and shipping a print of the intended size. Bear in mind, however, that the selection committee will be basing its decision on the print submitted, including its size and quality.
3. If the Museum decides to acquire an image for which an ink-jet print of unsatisfactory permanence has been submitted, the photographer must then provide an archival quality color print, using pigment-based inks, suitable for long-term conservation. The cost of producing and shipping the new print is borne by the photographer.
4. Prints in black and white must be printed on fiber-based paper and processed for long-term conservation. Submissions for selection, however, may be RC paper prints; if the Museum decides to acquire an image on RC paper, the photographer must provide a print on fiber-based paper and processed for long-term conservation. The cost of producing and shipping the new print is borne by the photographer.
5. Works must be signed, either on the face or on the back. Use a pencil for prints on fiber-based photographic paper and a Stabilo pencil or other pencil that can write on plastic for prints on plastic-based photographic paper.
6. Each print should be placed a separate transparent polypropylene or other plastic envelope; the entry form for each print should be attached with adhesive tape to the back of the envelope. Do not place more than one print in an envelope.
7. Works that are panel mounted, framed, or mounted on mat board are not acceptable.

The Selection Committee
Selection will be made by a selection committee appointed by the Museum. The 2013 selection committee members are Kikuji KAWADA, Masato SETO and Eikoh HOSOE (Director of the Museum).

Prices
Selected works will be purchased by the Museum at prices from JPY30,000 to JPY100,000 per work. In the case of multi-image works, the selection committee may, at its discretion, choose to purchase only some of the images. Photographers (copyright holders) whose work is selected for acquisition will be requested to sign the purchase agreement prescribed by the Museum.

Exhibition
The “Young Portfolio Acquisitions 2013” exhibition is scheduled to open in March, 2014, at the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts.

Application Fee
< For applications from Japan>
The application fee is JPY2,000 for applicants submitting one to 30 prints; for applicants submitting 31 to 50 prints, the application fee is JPY3,000.
< For applications from other countries>
The application fee is US$15 regardless of the number of prints submitted.

How to Apply
1. Applications are made via the Internet by registering on the Young Portfolio website. Thus, to apply, applicants must use a personal computer with Internet access, a browser able to open the Young Portfolio website, and a printer.
2. To apply, go to the Young Portfolio website, http://yp.kmopa.org/ and register the requested information about yourself and the work you are submitting.
3. Applicants whose environments do not support registration via the Website should contact the Young Portfolio Section of the Museum by telephone, e-mail, fax, or postal mail (see below) to provide the address to which the application form should be sent. Follow the instructions we will provide for registering your application. The deadline for receipt of requests for application forms is April 30, 2013.
4. To apply, the applicant must submit the followings:
❶ One or more works, each with the prescribed entry form attached.
❷ One copy of print-out of the personal information registration confirmation form.
❸ One copy of print-out of the works submitted registration confirmation form.
❹ One copy of a document identifying the applicant and stating his or her birth date.
❺ One copy of print-out of the e-mailed receipt from Pay Pal (or other payment method).

Registration and Payment Details

1) How to register on the Website
Please have the prints you are submitting organized and at your side before starting to register via the Website.
First, register the requested information about yourself on the Website.
After entering all the information, click the “Confirm” button, and the confirmation screen will appear. Check that the information you have entered is correct. If it is, print out a copy of this confirmation screen, to include with the work you are submitting. Note that you must complete the next step to complete your registration: After printing out the confirmation screen, click the “Register” button. When you have completed your registration, you will be issued a Web Registration Number.
The Web Registration Number
When you have completed registration of the information about yourself on the Website, you will be issued a Web Registration Number on-screen. A confirmation of your registration, with your Web Registration Number, will automatically be e-mailed to the e-mail address you provided in the information you registered.
Now register the requested information about the works you are submitting on the Website
Input the Web Registration Number, your name, your e-mail address, and then the information requested about the works you are submitting. When you have input all the requested information, click the “Confirm” button, and the confirmation screen will appear. Check that all the information you have input is correct. If it is, print out two copies of this confirmation screen. Cut up one copy into separate entry forms, one for each title you are submitting. Attach one entry form to the back of each transparent plastic envelope in which you have placed one work. Do not cut up the other copy of the confirmation screen printout. Enclose it, along with the print out you made of your personal information confirmation screen, when you submit your works. After printing out the confirmation screen, click “Register” to complete registration of the works you are submitting. Please note that the procedure for registering works differs depending on whether you are submitting one to 30 or 31 to 50 images. A message confirming the information you have registered will automatically be sent to the e-mail address you provided.

2) Payment of the Application Fee
1. Payment is via PayPal. Go to the Young Portfolio site http://yp.kmopa.org/ and click on “Young Portfolio Application,” then “Application Fee Payment” to complete payment by PayPal. Click the “Pay Now” button to transfer to the PayPal site. There, fill in the required items, and pay the application fee. When you have completed payment, a receipt will be e-mailed to the e-mail address you provided in the information you registered. Print out the receipt and enclose it with the works you are submitting.
2. If you are unable to pay using PayPal, consult the FAQ on the Young Portfolio site or contact the Young Portfolio Section.

How to bring or ship your work
1. Applicants wishing to bring their work directly in the Museum should take it to the Museum’s reception desk during the hours the Museum is open, within the application period.
2. Applicants in Japan may send work by mail, by one of the small parcel delivery services, or by the post office parcel service. Applicants overseas may send work by airmail (including registered mail), EMS, or courier. The Museum will not pay any customs duties or other attendant fees.
3. The applicant must bear all the costs incurred in submitting. For applicants from other countries, the cost of returning work, however, is included in the handling fee.
4. The applicant is responsible for taking out, for instance, shipping insurance on the work, if necessary.
5. To confirm that your work has been delivered, contact the shipping company or post office directly. Please do not inquire of the Museum.

Announcement of selections and returning work
1. We plan to announce the selections and return work not selected in August to September, 2013. Any major deviation from that schedule will be announced on our Website.
2. Applicants whose work is chosen will be notified in writing.
3. In lieu of a notification, we will return the works not chosen to the applicants.
4. Applicants who would prefer to pick up their work in person should enter that information in advance when they register their personal information. Works must be removed from the Museum within three months of the Museum’s sending written notifications of the selections. Notify the Museum in advance of when you will be arriving to remove your work.

Other points
1. Acquisitions will be kept in the Museum’s collection and exhibited.
2. While the photographer will retain the copyright, the Museum reserves the right to use images of acquisitions in Museum publications such as catalogues.
3. The photographer will be responsible for any objections raised by the subject of the photograph or the owner of that subject.
4. The Museum will keep on file biographical information on the photographers whose works are acquired, as reference material.
5. Applicants who change addresses after submitting their work or who will be away in August or September, when the Museum is scheduled to return their work, should let us know immediately by telephone, fax, or e-mail. If we have no valid address for the applicant and are not informed of a change in address within three months after the notification of results, we will dispose of work not selected.
6. The Museum will not be held liable for any damages unless the Museum is clearly proven to be fault.
7. All applications are made in compliance with these rules and regulations.
8. The personal information you have registered here will be protected appropriately in accord with the museum’s privacy policy.

For Submitting Applications and Further Information
Please Contact the Young Portfolio Section

Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts, Young Portfolio Section
3545 Kiyosato, Takane-cho, Hokuto-shi, Yamanashi 407-0301 Japan
Tel :+81-551-48-5599
Fax:+81-551-48-5445
E-mail:ypinfo@kmopa.com

Three Calls for Papers on Collecting and Museums. Deadlines: April / May 2013

Summary of this post

This is a three-in-one post on Calls for submissions for conferences that have to do with museums and collecting, in the widest sense.

  • The first one will be held in Gotha (Germany) in November 2013 and is on Collections and the Marketplace, as part of the wider theme Economies of Collections and the Value of Scientific Things. Conference languages: German and English.
  • The second call is for a conference to be held in September 2014 (sic!) in Berlin, with the working title Mars and Museum. European Museums during the First World War. Conference languages: German, English, French
  • The third conference looking for contributions is held in June 2013, by the University of York under the title The Role of Collectors, Critics, Curators in Artistic Practice c. 1780-1914.

Please find all three calls hereafter.


Sammlungsökonomien. Vom Wert wissenschaftlicher Dinge, Teil 1:
Sammeln und Markt seit dem späten 18. Jahrhundert

Call for Papers

*** English version below ***

Gotha, 21./22. November 2013

In Sammlungen vermischen sich epistemische und ökonomische Kreisläufe. Wissenschaftliches Sammeln lässt sich als ein Prozess der Wertschöpfung begreifen, der Kapital mobilisiert und anhäuft – soziales, ökonomisches, politisches, vor allem aber wissenschaftliches Kapital. Dies hängt unmittelbar mit der Materialität von Sammlungen zusammen: Sammeln verbindet die Produktion wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnis mit der Herstellung und Zirkulation von Dingen. Während die jüngsten Forschungen zu Museen, Sammlungen und Wissensdingen vor allem deren Erkenntniswert in den Mittelpunkt gestellt haben, konzentriert sich der erste Workshop zum Thema “Sammlungsökonomien” auf den wenig beachteten Zusammenhang von Sammeln, Wissen und ökonomischer Wertzuschreibung seit dem späten 18. Jahrhundert. Denn Dinge und Wissenschaften sind historisch sehr konkret durch verschiedene Märkte und Ökonomien miteinander verbunden. Wissensdinge werden gehandelt, verkauft, getauscht und geschenkt. Sie werden ausgestellt, zirkulieren zwischen Sammlern, Händlern, Besitzern und Institutionen und erhalten in diesen Kreisläufen ihren spezifischen Wert.

Die Schnittstellen von Sammeln und Markt prägen sowohl Archive, die wie die Sammlung Perthes in Gotha aus betriebswirtschaftlichen Kalkülen angelegt wurden, als auch naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen wie beispielsweise im Berliner Naturkundemuseum, die scheinbar rein wissenschaftlich motiviert sind. Mit dem Fokus auf Sammlungsökonomien lassen sich sowohl diese geldökonomischen Prozesse als auch sammlungsinterne Fragen des Verwaltens, Haushaltens und Ordnens des Wissens historisch schärfer fassen. Diese Perspektive erlaubt es zudem, aktuelle wissenschaftspolitische Entwicklungen anders zu diskutieren, denn Debatten über Sammlungen und deren historische Erschließung sind zunehmend durch eine Rhetorik der kulturellen Ökonomie geprägt. Objekte werden als Teil unseres „kulturellen Erbes“ definiert, den es als Beleg und Ausweis der wissenschaftlichen, nationalen und kulturellen Gegenwart zu bewahren gilt.

Ziel des Workshops “Sammeln und Markt” ist es, an Fallbeispielen zu zeigen, dass der Kultur- und Erkenntniswert wissenschaftlicher Dinge untrennbar mit ökonomischen Infrastrukturen verbunden ist. Wir fragen danach, ob und wie sich Sammlungsökonomien historisieren lassen. Wie etwa veränderte sich der Wissenshandel, als fürstliche und gelehrte Sammlungen seit dem späten 18. Jahrhundert verstärkt in staatlichen Besitz übergingen? Welchen Einfluss hatte die politische Förderung von Sammlungsreisen? In welcher Beziehung stand der privatwirtschaftliche Markt für wissenschaftliche Dinge mit den akademischen Sammlungen? Wie wurden Sammlungen organisiert, damit sie ökonomisch, d.h. effizient, benutzt werden konnten? Welchen Status hatte das Original in Bezug auf Dublette oder Reproduktion? Wie beeinflusste die Zirkulation von Dingen zwischen Akademie und Handel wissenschaftliche Diskurse, Disziplinen und Institutionen? Wie veränderte der Handel die epistemische Struktur von Sammlungen? Inwiefern wurde Kategorisierung wissenschaftlicher Objekte als “neu” oder “einzigartig” durch einen Markt gesteuert? Welche ökonomischen und historischen Wechselwirkungen lassen sich zwischen Ordnen, Präsentieren und Vermarkten erkennen und wie wirken diese bis heute fort?

Mit diesem Call for Papers laden wir Forscher/innen und Nachwuchswissenschaftler/innen aus unterschiedlichen Bereichen – von der Sammlungsgeschichte und -theorie, über Sozial- und Wirtschaftsgeschichte bis hin zur Wissenschafts-, Kunst- und Kulturgeschichte – ein, die Verbindungen von Sammlungs- und Ökonomiegeschichte zu diskutieren. Ziel ist es, einen Einstieg in das umfassende Thema “Sammlungsökonomien” zu finden, der in Folgeveranstaltungen erweitert und vertieft werden soll.

Die Tagung ist eine Kooperation des Projektes “Globalisierung und lokales Wissen: Sammlungsbezogene Forschung zum Verlag Justus Perthes” am Forschungszentrum Gotha der Universität Erfurt und der kulturwissenschaftlichen Forschungsinitiative “PAN – Perspektiven auf Natur” am Berliner Museum für Naturkunde. Sie findet am 21./22. November 2013 auf Schloss Friedenstein in Gotha statt. Konferenzsprachen sind Deutsch und Englisch. Bewerbungen mit Abstracts (max. 500 Wörter) und kurzem Lebenslauf bitte bis spätestens 31. Mai 2013 an nils.guettler@uni-erfurt.de oder ina.heumann@mfn-berlin.de senden.

Konzept und Organisation: Nils Güttler & Ina Heumann

Dr. des. Nils Güttler
Projekt: Globalisierung und lokales Wissen
Forschungszentrum Gotha der Universität Erfurt
Postfach 100561
99855 Gotha
+49(0)361/737-1726

Dr. Ina Heumann
PAN – Perspektiven auf Natur
Museum für Naturkunde
Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung
Invalidenstr. 43
10115 Berlin
+49(0)30/2093-8977

Wissenschaftlicher Beirat: Martin Mulsow, Susanne Rau, Petra Weigel

******************************

Call for Papers (English version)

Economies of Collections and the Value of Scientific Things
Part 1: Collections and the Marketplace since the late 18th Century

Gotha, November 21-22, 2013

Scientific collecting is a process that mobilizes and spawns social, economic, political, and scientific capital. The materiality of collections links the production of scientific knowledge to the production and movement of things. Whereas historical research has recently emphasized the epistemic impact of collections we want to focus on their often neglected economic dimensions from the late 18th century onwards. Historically, things and sciences have always been connected through marketplaces and economies. Prior to public display, scientific things used to circulate between collectors, traders, owners, and institutions. Indeed, things acquire their unique value by means of circulation.

To focus on the economies of collections affords a clearer picture of monetary processes. As such it also draws attention to questions concerning the management, house-keeping and ordering of knowledge within collections. Economies, for instance, have shaped the archive of the cartographical publishing company Perthes in Gotha as well as the collections of the Berliner Naturkunde Museum. Furthermore, the perspective on the economies of collections allows for new discussions about contemporary scientific and political developments. Being dominated by rhetorics of cultural economies objects are defined as part of our cultural heritage.

The workshop series “Economies of Collections and the Value of Scientific Things” argues that cultural and epistemic values of objects are intrinsically linked with economic infrastructures. In part 1 – “Collections and the Marketplace” – we ask how such a history can be established. How did the scientific marketplace change when early modern collections were transferred into the possession of nation states in the late 18th century? What impact did political sponsorship have on expeditions? To what extent were private and academic markets connected? How were collections efficiently organized? What status did originals have in relation to copies? How did the economic circulation of objects shape scientific debates and what was its impact on new disciplines and institutions? In which way did 19th-century trade change the status of objects from the “typical” to the “exceptional”? How can historians come to an integrative view on processes of ordering, presenting, and marketing?

With this call for papers we invite researchers and young scholars to collaboratively explore the relations between collections and the marketplace. Contributions from different disciplines are welcome including, for instance, the history of science, the history and theory of collections, history of economics, art history and cultural studies. This call for papers is an initial articulation of our interest in “Economies of Collections” to be extended and deepened in forthcoming workshops.

The conference is a co-operation between the project “Globalisation and local knowledge: research on collections of the publishing company Justus Perthes” at the Research Institute for Social and Cultural Studies in Gotha, Universität Erfurt and the research initiative “PAN – Perspectives on Nature” at the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. The conference will take place on November 21-22, 2013 in Gotha. Applications in German or English including abstracts (max. 500 words) and a short CV are due on May 31, 2013.
Contact: nils.guettler@uni-erfurt.de or ina.heumann@mfn-berlin.de

Organizers: Nils Güttler & Ina Heumann

Dr. des. Nils Güttler
Projekt: Globalisierung und lokales Wissen
Forschungszentrum Gotha der Universität Erfurt
Postfach 100561
99855 Gotha
+49(0)361/737-1726

Dr. Ina Heumann
PAN – Perspektiven auf Natur
Museum für Naturkunde
Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung
Invalidenstr. 43
10115 Berlin
+49(0)30/2093-8977


Mars and Museum. European Museums during the First World War (working title)

International Conference organised by
Bénédicte Savoy (Technische Universität Berlin),
Petra Winter (Zentralarchiv der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin – Preußischer Kulturbesitz),
Christina Kott (Centre Marc Bloch Berlin, Université Panthéon-Assas Paris)

Date: September 18, 2014 – September 20, 2014

Location: Technische Universität Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135,
10623 Berlin, and the Museum Hamburger Bahnhof, Invalidenstrasse 50-51,
10557 Berlin

Submission deadline: April 30, 2013

– please scroll down for German version –

Today it has almost been forgotten that not only the Second World War
but also the First World War constituted a crucial break in the history
of European museums.  As a matter of fact, the Louvre was almost
completely evacuated and the holdings sent to Toulouse and Blois. The
Hermitage, in Saint Petersburg, was transformed into a military
hospital for several years, and its collections were transported to
Moscow. In Berlin, the marvelous coin collection from the Kaiser
Friedrich Museum (today’s Bode Museum) was endangered since the
Reichsbank, the National Bank of the German Reich, had made a claim on
it as a guarantee for its gold.  And the British Museum in London lost
11 of its curators to the war. On the Western as well as on the Eastern
Front, museum activities were interrupted or disordered for many years
due to destruction and evacuations. The acquisition of new works of art
was difficult during and especially in the aftermath of the war.
However, in many museums the war opened up unexpected opportunities to
undertake museum reforms, create new displays, and make architectural
changes. The history of European museums during the First World War has
not yet been written, or if so then only within the framework of
institutional histories of some of the large and middle-sized museums.
The aim of the scheduled conference is to highlight, for the first
time, the fate of museum buildings, museum collections, and museum
collaborators during the First World War in a transnational and
comparative perspective. Structural similarities, as well as national
characteristics, in the different museum war histories will be
analyzed. The conference aims not only to reflect the transnational
turn of museum studies but also intends to promote it by identifying
gaps and desiderata for research.

The focus of papers – which may be case studies or comparative studies
– should be on one of the following aspects:

1) Actors
Lines of action, scope, circulation, and experiences of museum
collaborators within their home institutions or behind the front line.
The role of women. Political and scientific positioning in the European
“Cultural War.” Museum activities in war areas and occupied
territories. Development of war-associated exhibitions.

2) Discourses
Involvement of museums as “temples of culture” in the battle against
the “barbarian enemy,” by means of propagandist writings and lectures
made by the different warring parties. Shaping of museum-specific
argumentation lines in ethnological museums. Development of special
terminologies at the interface between “art protection” and “art
looting.” Museums and museum collections in the visual propaganda.

3) Art Works and collections
Evacuations and war losses, protective measures at and in museums.
Restitution claims for single works of art or whole collections,
looting plans. Maintained or interrupted exhibition activities.
Transformation of museum buildings for war purposes. Art collections as
financial factors. Organization of war exhibitions behind the front
line. Acquisition politics, art market, and war. Plans for museum
rearrangements and new buildings. Dealing with excavations under museum
administration in front areas and in non-European regions.

Please send your submissions (approx. 1000 characters) for a 30-minute
lecture as well as some short biographical notes by April 30, 2013 to
Bénédicte Savoy (benedicte.savoy@tu-berlin.de) and Christina Kott
(christina.kott@u-paris2.fr). Conference languages are German, English,
and French.

******************************

Internationale Tagung

Mars und Museum. Europäische Museen im Ersten Weltkrieg [Arbeitstitel]

Prof. Dr. Bénédicte Savoy (Technische Universität Berlin), Dr. Petra
Winter (Zentralarchiv der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin – Preußischer
Kulturbesitz), Dr. Christina Kott (Centre Marc Bloch Berlin, Université
Panthéon-Assas Paris)

Datum: 18.9. – 20.09.2014

Ort: Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623
Berlin/ Hamburger Bahnhof, Invalidenstraße 50-51, 10557 Berlin

Deadline: 30. April 2013

Es ist weitgehend in Vergessenheit geraten, dass nicht nur der Zweite,
sondern auch der Erste Weltkrieg ein bedeutender Einschnitt in der
Geschichte der europäischen Museen war. Der Louvre wurde 1914 von Paris
nach Toulouse und Blois fast komplett evakuiert. Die Eremitage in St.
Petersburg verwandelte sich für Jahre in ein Kriegslazarett und ihre
Sammlungen wurden nach Moskau verlagert. In Berlin gefährdete der Krieg
u.a. die großartige Münzsammlung im Kaiser-Friedrich-Museum (heute
Bode-Museum), die von der Reichsbank als Garantie für Gold in Anspruch
genommen wurde. Das British Museum verlor elf seiner Kustoden. In den
Operations- und Besatzungsgebieten im Westen und Osten war der
Museumsbetrieb aufgrund von Zerstörungen und der Evakuierung vieler
Sammlungen jahrelang unterbrochen oder gestört; während und besonders
nach dem Krieg blieben Neuerwerbungen erschwert. In vielen
Institutionen eröffneten sich in der unmittelbaren Nachkriegszeit aber
auch ungeahnte Möglichkeiten für die Umsetzung von Reformen,
Neuordnungen und Umbauten. Die Geschichte der europäischen Museen im
Ersten Weltkrieg ist bislang, wenn überhaupt nur im Rahmen der
Institutionsgeschichte großer und mittlerer Museen aufgearbeitet.
Ziel der geplanten Tagung ist es, das Schicksal von Museumsbauten, von
Sammlungen, sowie des Museumspersonals im Ersten Weltkrieg erstmalig
vergleichend und transnational zu beleuchten. Die strukturellen
Gemeinsamkeiten der unterschiedlichen Museumsgeschichten im Krieg
sollen ebenso beleuchtet werden wie auch nationale Spezifizitäten. So
soll die Tagung die sich zunehmend internationalisierende
Museumsforschung nicht nur widerspiegeln, sondern durch Identifizierung
von Forschungslücken und Desiderata auch entscheidend vorantreiben.

Folgende Aspekte sollen, als Fallbeispiele oder aus vergleichender
Perspektive, im Mittelpunkt stehen:

1. Akteure
Handlungsweisen, Spielräume, Zirkulation und Erfahrungen von
Museumsmitarbeitern an ihren angestammten Institutionen bzw. an der
Front. Rolle der Frauen. Politische und wissenschaftliche
Positionierungen im europäischen „Krieg der Geister“. Museumsarbeit in
den Operations- und Besatzungsgebieten. Erarbeitung kriegsaffiner
Ausstellungsprojekte.

2. Diskurse
Einbeziehung der Museen als Tempel der Kultur gegen die „Barbarei“ des
Feindes in Propagandaschriften und Vorträgen der jeweiligen
Kriegsparteien. Gestaltung museumsspezifischer Argumentationsstränge in
Völkerkundemuseen. Entwicklung spezifischer Terminologien an der
Schnittstelle zwischen „Kunstschutz“ und „Kunstraub“. Museen und
Museumssammlungen in der Bild-Propaganda der Zeit.

3. Werke und Sammlungen
Auslagerungen und Kriegsverluste, Schutzmassnahmen an und in Museen.
Forderungen nach „Restitution“ einzelner Werke oder Sammlungen,
Kunstraubpläne. Ausstellungstätigkeit bzw. Ausstellungsstopp im Krieg.
Umwidmung von Museumsgebäuden zu Kriegszwecken. Kunstsammlungen als
wirtschaftlicher Faktor. Ausstellungsorganisation an der Front.
Erwerbungspolitik, Kunstmarkt und Krieg. Neuordnungs- und Umbaupläne.
Umgang mit Museumsgrabungen in Frontgebieten und im außereuropäischen
Raum.

Skizzen zu Vorträgen im Umfang von etwa 1.000 Zeichen und kurze Angaben
zur Biographie für 30minütige Vorträge werden bis zum 30. April 2013
erbeten an Prof. Dr. Bénédicte Savoy (benedicte.savoy@tu-berlin.de) und
Dr. Christina Kott (christina.kott@u-paris2.fr). Tagungssprachen sind
deutsch, englisch und französisch.


The Role of Collectors, Critics, Curators in Artistic Practice

York, Humanities Research Centre, June 26, 2013

Deadline: Apr 26, 2013

Collaborators: The Role of Collectors, Critics, Curators in Artistic
Practice c. 1780-1914

26 June 2013, Humanities Research Centre, University of York

In May 1884 the art critic Marion Harry Spielmann wrote in defence of
the often criticised profession of art criticism: ‘The critic – (I am
not now referring to the mere notice writer of daily journalism) –
spends his life in devotion not only to art but to artists: and, so far
as public recognition is concerned, he reaps his reward in sneers and
‘chaff’: sneers from painters, thoughtless and irresponsible, like Mr
Whistler; indifference from others less splenetic and querulous.’
Spielmann, a prolific author, editor and arts administrator, was an
advocate for and close friend of numerous contemporary artists. Along
with the collectors and curators whom he frequently worked with and
wrote about, he was an active and influential participant in
contemporary art practice in late-Victorian London.

Relationships between artists, collectors, critics and curators are
often considered in isolation but rarely in tandem. Drawing upon a
diverse range of case studies, covering a variety of local and global
contexts, this one day post-graduate workshop aims to unpick
consistencies, changes and crossovers in the sometimes fraught but
often productive relationships between artists, collectors, critics and
curators in the long nineteenth century. By bringing together students,
early-career researchers and established academics, we hope the
workshop will provide an informal but stimulating forum for
conversation, debate and interdisciplinary exchange about the
nineteenth-century art world and its constituents.

We invite proposals for twenty-minute papers from postgraduate
students, early career researchers and established academics.

Papers might explore, but are not limited to, the following topics:
•    The advent of professional art critics and curators and its impact
on artistic practice
•    Patronage and collecting in the long nineteenth century
•    Artists as collectors, critics and curators
•    The fabrication and decoration of Museum buildings
•    Curating contemporary art in the long nineteenth century
•    The art press and art publishing
•    The Grand Tour/tourists as collectors, critics and curators
•    Conversations/collaborations in the studio
•    Collectors, critics, curators and local/regional/national
identities
•    Agency and authorship in artistic practice in the long nineteenth
century
•    Documents: catalogues, contracts and correspondence

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Charlotte Drew (
ckd502@york.ac.uk) and Eoin Martin (eoin.martin@warwick.ac.uk) by
Friday 26 April.

This event is generously supported by the Centre for Modern Studies,
University of York.

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