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AFTER POST-PHOTOGRAPHY 5 Conference, 23-25 May 2019, St. Petersburg

Conference APP. Cultural, historical and visual studies in photography

23-25 May 2019,
European University in St Petersburg

Addressing one of the most common concepts that define the nature and function of photography, the fifth edition of the conference After Post-Photography  aims to re-think the fundamental notions and offer new perspectives on the subject of photography and its connection with memory.

Memory is a notion commonly brought forward when speaking about photography. The very idea of close connection between memory and photography has long found itself at the basis of the (re)construction of histories and identities.

The photographic image, when regarded as a material evocation of memories, is supposed to not only preserve the past, but to represent a selection of moments worthy of being captured and retained. In this sense, photography has caused fundamental changes to mental structures, such as remembrance and forgetting. Its mechanics, however, is still indecisive: is photography something that evokes memory – or something that enhances oblivion? Furthermore, is a photograph something that really speaks of a moment of the past, or does it rather testify of certain modes of cultural optics? Is there still a possibility to ‘remember’ with, or through photographs? After all, the traditional belief in photography’s truthfulness, its indexical function, the freezing of a decisive moment, or proof of “what has been”, all this stands in strong contrast with the contemporary discussions on fake news, artificially constructed memories, post-reality politics and “augmented” realities.

The conference is chaired by Maria Gourieva, Olga Davydova, Natalia Mazur, Moritz Neumüller, Daria Panaiotti, and Friedrich Tietjen. It is organized in collaboration with the conference “PHOTOGRAPHY AS ART. Current trends in study and the history of national schools”, at the Russian Academy of Arts, Moscow, May 27-29, 2019.

This three-day event will feature four keynote speeches, eight presentations, and a round table, by scholars from Russia, Europe, the United States and Japan.   

Day 1 will feature two evening lectures, one by Fred Ritchin on The Post-Photographic Challenge, the other by Helen Petrovsky on Photography: Memory Formulae.

Day 2 will start with a morning panel dedicated to Photograph Politics, or: How to Show (and how to not). The afternoon will feature the panel Present Photography, or: How to Rethink Pictures. A get-together dinner will be the perfect setting to keep the discussions going on into the later hours.

Day 3 will be dedicated to the panel Photographic Projections, or: How to Show What Never Happened, and a round table discussion on Photography Studies in Russia, before we wrap up the conference in a general Q&A session.

All talks will take place at the European University in St. Petersburg, 1 Shpalernaya street / metro Chernyshevskaya

Talks and presentations will be held both in English and Russian. Simultaneous translation will be provided.  

Timetable

23 May 2019

16.30 Registration for speakers

17.00 Keynote: Fred Ritchin (ICP, USA): The Post-Photographic Challenge

18.30 Keynote: Helen Petrovsky (Russ. Acad. of Sciences, Russia): Photography: Memory Formulae

24 May 2019

10.15 Registration for speakers

10.45 Welcome

Panel 1: Photograph Politics, or: How to Show (and how to not).

11.00 Carole Naggar France/USA): A Closet, a Suitcase and a Warehouse: David «Chim» Seymour’s Archives

11.30 Susumu Shimonishi (Tokyo University of the Arts): Japanese Photography Magazines. The Case of CAMERA MAINICHI

12.00 Coffee break

12.30 Denis Skopin (St. Petersburg State Univ.): Elimination of the Enemies of the People from Group Photographs in Stalin’s Russia: Political and Psychological Aspects

13.00 Discussion

13.30 Lunch break

Panel 2: Present Photography, or: How to Rethink Pictures

14.30 Irina Chmyreva (Research Centre for Theory and History of Arts, Russian Academy of Fine Arts): Echo of Political Realities in Photography: Studies of Reading National History in Art Photography Projects from 1990-2010s

15.00 Michelle Bogre (Parsons School of Design, USA): The Photograph Unmoored: Truth and Authenticity in the 21st Century

15.30 Alexander Streitberger (Univ. catholique Louvain, Belgium): The Photographic Ruins of the Future

16.00 Discussion

16:30 Coffee break

17.00 Keynote: Andrés Mario Zervigón (Rutgers University, USA): The Camera Lens: Fully Visible and Transparent

18.30 Keynote: Gil Pasternak (Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, UK): Photography in Politics: Remembering and Being Together, With Photographs

25 May 2019

Panel 3: Photographic Projections, or: How to Show What Never Happened

10.30 Oksana Sarkisova (Central European University, Hungary): Imagining Soviet Space: Representations of Travel in Vernacular Photographic Collections

11.00 Maria Gourieva (European University/St. Petersburg State University), Friedrich Tietjen (Germany/Austria): Everybody Lives the Same (in private photographs)

11.30 Discussion

12.00 Coffee break

12.30 Keynote: Galina Orlova (Higher School of Economics, Russia): Anonymous Archive, Digitalization, Recycling

14.00 Lunch break

15.00 Roundtable discussion for educators and researchers: Photography Studies in Russia: Challenges and Perspectives

17.00 Final remarks and outlook

 

The Conference takes place at the European University, 1 Shpalernaya street, St. Petersburg. Nearest metro station: Chernyshevskaya.

Any changes to this timetable will be announced on the website www.after-post.photography and the telegram channel afterpostphotographytelegram.   

 

Conference on Photography as Art. Moscow, May 2019. Deadline: April 25, 2019.

International Scientific Conference
PHOTOGRAPHY AS AN ART: Current trends in study and the history of national schools

Organizers:
Russian Academy of Arts
Research Institute of Theory and History of Fine Arts
Moscow Museum of Modern Art

Partners of the Conference:
Instituto Europeo di Design, Madrid, Spain
PhotoVisa International Festival of Photography, Russia
Novoe Iskusstvoznanie [New Art Knowledge] magazine, St. Petersburg, Russia
Photographer.ru

May 27-29, 2019
Venue: Russian Academy of Arts, Moscow, Russia

Photography is one of the oldest image-making technologies in the modern world. Generations of artists and viewers have grown up surrounded by photography. It is everywhere. Photography is both established and dynamic.
In the context of the massive technological changes sweeping across contemporary visual culture, the place of photography may appear less significant. It even brings to mind the situation of 180 years ago where, during the presentation of a new type of image-making – photography – to the public, an onlooker exclaimed: “Today, painting died!” But it is photography that freed painters to create a new kind of art, the medium of painting transformed but still just as vital and relevant. Similarly, the evolution of technology in relation to photography allows us, first, to clarify what photography actually is in today’s world, and second, to attempt an understanding of the relationship between photography and contemporary art.
Since the beginning of the XXI century, there is no doubt among educated viewers and visual culture researchers that specific expressions of photography qualify it as an art. But, to date, there has been insufficient development of the history of the national schools of photography. This history is especially essential for young researchers and creators. There are histories of regional photography venues and national schools that have never been written. In Russia, it was in the mid-twentieth century that the structure of how the history of photography was represented was established and, since then, this concept of history has remained unchanged.
This conference does not propose revisionism. Rather, the goal is to open a discussion on the methods and strategies for writing the history of photography from around the world.
The title of the conference includes the phrase “history of national schools [of photographies]”. Organizers of the conference understand such schools to encompass a double meaning. First of all, it suggests the definition of regional specifics, the phenomenology of reflection on the history and culture of the regions, states and nations in the formation of regional photography. Second, schools suggest the educational process within the studies of modern art and humanities, where photography is both an educational tool and the subject of study.

Thus, the conference “Photography as an art: Current trends in study and the history of national schools” covers three main areas:
– the study of photography as a medium and the scope of its realization as an art;
– the methods and practices for writing national photography histories;
– the teaching of photography, its history and technology, within art education and the study of photography in the educational context of the humanities.

The aim of this meeting of experts is to define the current state of theory and research in the field, and also to create a foundation for future scholarship and study.

This conference is held in partnership with the editorial board of Routledge Companion to Photography and Visual Culture and the 5th International conference After Post-Photography, May 23-25 in St. Petersburg.

Conference working languages: Russian, English.
Time-limit: reports – 20 minutes. Within the framework of the conference round table – 10 minutes.
Applications are accepted in Russian and English. Abstracts will be published before the conference.
Applications are accepted until 00:00 April 25, 2019 at the email address mos.photo.conference2019@gmail.com
Contact person: Irina Chmyreva, PhD, executive chairman of the organizing committee of the conference

Photobook Conference. Call for Papers. Deadline: Nov 15, 2018

CFP: The Photobook (Oxford, 14-16 Mar 19)

Maison Française d’Oxford, March 14 – 16, 2019
Deadline: Nov 15, 2018

Maison Française d’Oxford 2019 Photobook Conference :

The British, American and French Photobook:
Commitment, Memory, Materiality and the Art Market (1900-2019)

A conference to be held at the Maison Française, Oxford
Thursday 14 to Saturday 16 March 2019

The Maison Française conference committee invites proposals on the social history of the British, American or French photobook from 1900 to the present. Papers will address: commitment or explicit political engagement; memory, commemoration and the writing of history; materiality (whether real or virtual), and how material form affects circulation, handling, critical responses and the social life of the photobook. We invite contributors to analyse these topics with respect to the growth of the market for the photobook as a commodity and an object of bibliophilic attention. Proposals focusing on contemporary productions are particularly welcome.

Recent illustrated anthologies in the vein of The Photobook: A History (Gerry Badger and Martin Parr, 2004, 2006, 2014) have established three things: firstly, the photobook-photographer is an editor and an author, or auteur (in the cinematographic sense, but applied to “directing” the production of a book); secondly, the photobook is an autonomous work of art, and a collectible object of connoisseurship; thirdly, the photobook “art world” now exists and can be studied.

This conference will concern itself with the social history of the photobook, whether photographer-driven, writer-driven, editor-driven, or publisher-driven. For the purposes of this conference, the definition of the photobook will be extended to include all photographically illustrated books, regardless of subject matter or the proportion of text to image, or indeed whether or not the images are “illustrative” in the strict sense of the word.

Three major questions arise concerning the photobook as a medium:
• Firstly, what place is there for literary fiction or imaginative picture-making in photobooks committed to documentary truth-telling or historical accuracy? In a word, how do fact and fiction, objectivity and subjectivity, cohere?
• Secondly, to what extent does the self-fashioning of the photographer in the art market interfere with the narrative meaning of a photobook? What is the influence of the art market on the photobook or on the writing of photobook histories? And how has the art market for photobooks changed since the bibliophilic creations of the early twentieth century?
• Thirdly, unlike individual prints that become unmoored without their captions, and which can be appropriated and re-used against themselves, can a photo-text shore itself up against appropriation? Is it a privileged pedagogical medium? A self-sufficient medium? This leads to a related question: how have certain photobooks changed with time? How have famous or reprinted photobooks been differently interpreted by different audiences? What has been the afterlife of politically committed photobooks? How, and in what circumstances, have certain photobooks contributed to writing or re-writing local memory or “collective memory”, at the time of their publication and over time?

To answer these questions, specialists in the history of photography, book studies and visual studies are invited to dialogue with researchers in such disciplines as sociology, anthropology, critical race theory, queer theory, gender studies, post-colonial studies and comparative literature. Papers may be disciplinary or multidisciplinary.

Papers shall be given in English.
Proposals are due by 15 November 2018.
Send 300-word abstracts (as an email attachment in Microsoft Word format, RTF, or PDF) along with a one-page CV to
paul.edwards@cnrs.fr

Roundtable sessions of 60 to 90 minutes may be proposed. They should be pre-organised, and include 3 to 5 panellists. To propose a roundtable, the discussion moderator will send a single 300-word abstract describing the chosen topic, as well as supplying the full details of each panellist, namely their contact information (email and phone number), affiliation and a one-page CV for each. Please be sure to confirm the participation of all panellists before submitting an abstract.
Roundtable proposals are due by 15 November 2018.

Confirmation of acceptance will be sent by 15 January 2019.
One-page/500-word abstracts must be sent by 15 February 2019.

Conference venue :
Maison Française d’Oxford
2-10 Norham Road
Oxford OX2 6SE
Oxfordshire
England

Coordinator:
Paul Edwards (MFO, CNRS/LARCA, Université Paris Diderot)

Conference website :
http://www.mfo.cnrs.fr/research/axes-de-recherches/litterature/call-for-papers-the-british-american-and-french-photobook/

Bibliography (selection)
AUER M. et M. (2007), Photo Books from the M+M Auer Collection, Hermance, Editions M+M.
BOOM Mattie and SUERMONDT Rik (1989), Photography between Covers: The Dutch Documentary Photobook after 1945, Amsterdam, Fragment Uitgeverij.
BOUQUERET Christian (2012), Paris. Les livres de photographies des années 1920 aux années 1950, Paris, Gründ.
DI BELLO Patrizia, WILSON Colette and ZAMIR Shamoon (eds) (2012), The Photobook: from Talbot to Ruscha and beyond, New York, I.B. Tauris.
EDWARDS Elizabeth and HART Janice (eds) (2004), Photographs Objects Histories: on the Materiality of Images, London, Routledge.
EDWARDS Paul (2016), Perle noire. Le photobook littéraire, Rennes, Presses Universitaires de Rennes.
FERNÁNDEZ Horacio (2011), The Latin American Photobook, New York, Aperture.
FERNÁNDEZ Horacio (2014), Photobooks Spain 1905-1977, Madrid, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía/RM/Acción Cultural Española.
FERNÁNDEZ Horacio (2017), New York in Photobooks, Barcelona, Editorial RM/Centro José Guerrero.
GIERSTBERG Frits and SUERMONDT Rik (2012), The Dutch Photobook, New York, Aperture.
KANEKO Ryuichi and VARTANIAN Ivan (2009), Japanese Photobooks of the 1960s and 70s, New York, Aperture.
KARASIK Mikhail and Heiting Manfred (2015), The Soviet Photobook 1920-1941, Göttingen, Steidl.
MEIZEL Laureline (2018), “Inventer le livre illustré par la photographie en France 1876-1897”, DPhil, Paris I University.
NEUMÜLLER Moritz and MARTIN Lesley A. (eds) (2017), Photobook Phenomenon, Barcelona, Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona/Fundació Foto Colectania/RM Editores.
PARR Martin and BADGER Gerry (2004, 2006, 2014), The Photobook: A History, 3 vols., London, Phaidon.
PARR Martin and WASSINKLUNDGREN (2016) : The Chinese Photobook: from the 1900s to the Present, New York, Aperture.
PFRUNDER Peter (2011), Swiss Photobooks from 1927 to the Present, Zurich, Lars Muller Publishers.
RITCHIN Fred and NAGGAR Carole (2016), Magnum Photobook, London, Phaidon.
ROTH Andrew (2001), The Book of 101 Books: Seminal Photographic Books of the Twentieth Century, New York, PPP Editions/Roth Horowitz.
ROTH Andrew (ed.) (2004), The Open Book: A history of the photographic book from 1878 to the present, Gothenburg, Hasselblad Center.