Artistic Residencies Program for Accessibility Project, Vienna, Bath, London. Deadline: May 22, 2017

ARCHES: How can we use technology to make museums accessible to everyone including people who don’t like technology?

Description of the challenges faced by the Project

ARCHES project is working with people who have differences and difficulties associated with perception, memory, cognition and communication to develop applications, online platform and multisensory technology to enhance museum accessibility. We met weekly at the V&A and Wallace Museums in London and next year will also work with museums in London and next year will also work with museums in Vienna, Madrid and Oviedo. The members of our participatory research groups have the full gamut of access needs and intellectual/sensory impairments. The London Exploration Group have identified a key challenge for ARCHES to be the need to develop creative interpretation. They want to move beyond the limited opportunities provided by current models of access, so they transcend the delivery of information to encapsulate the spirit of an artwork and its space within the museum. They are seeking to transform the technologies so that the interpretation becomes artwork and access is no longer additional but integral to the museum visit.

Brief description of technology

ARCHES will bring together several technologies, including an accessible software platform, a set of applications for handheld devices and on-site multisensory activities. They will be developed in parallel with the exploration sessions organised at the museums so that the feedback from the exploration groups can be incorporated to the final versions. Accessible software platform: Image processing functionalities such a zoom, colour inversion, contrast enhancement, photonegative; integration of digital cultural heritage resources from external sources; search engine to find similar works on the Internet; automatic generation of descriptions based on metadata; social network interaction. Applications for handheld devices: Functionalities such as text-to-speech conversion for artefact descriptions using Augmented Reality; avatar technology supporting those who use forms of sign language; QR codes to obtain complementary information on the artworks adapted to the user’s profile: assisted indoor guidance. ‘Our story’ app to create a story/video from photos and share the experience. Multisensory activities: Touchable reliefs from two-dimensional images like paintings/photos; relief printer inspired by the pin art toy; and a context-sensitive tactile audio guide that provides help in the tactile and autonomous exploration.

What the project is looking to gain from the collaboration and what kind of artist would be suitable

As individuals, our participants have hugely diverse skills, background and experiences, yet collectively we represent the totality of impairment. To respond to this rich and varied situation we must collectively offer stimulation yet solitude and calm, simplicity for some and complexity for others, whilst recognising that no single sense can be relied upon and no single solution will be enough. The Artist we seek must be profoundly excited by working in a multimodal, multisensory and participatory way to engage with our diversity. They need to be able to inspire, share, listen and respond using a wide range of sensory and conceptual approaches. They must work in a tactile way (perhaps seeking to use light and colour, sounds, smells and tastes as they explore both the material of the museum and the technology of the project) recognising the need for ideas to be both provocative, evocative and readily understood.

Resources available to the artist

We offer an artist workspace in Vienna, an office space in Bath with access to a range of technologies, (for example animation and multi-modal media) or office space in Milton Keynes. We can also provide meetings spaces in London and access to technology at our museum bases there. We have technology partners in Oviedo who could provide additional office space and access to a diverse range of software and hardware. As part of our travel costs for the project there would be sums available to facilitate participatory ways of working and transporting participants to enable this. All our partners are close to airports and mainline rail and general transport links.
More info on ARCHES: http://arches-project.eu
More info on how to apply for the residency: http://vertigo.starts.eu/residencies-program/

AC/E Digital Culture Annual Report for Download

Interested in digital trends in the arts? 3D-Printing? Neuroscience
applied to technology? Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things and
Big Data applied to culture, and the use of digital technology in music. Then download Acción Cultural Española’s fourth edition of the AC/E Digital Culture Annual Report.  It follows an editorial policy of familiarising professionals of the culture sector with the main digital trends they need to be aware of over the coming years.

AnnualRep2017_english

Why The Tate Gallery is right to put on a queer art exhibition: Issues in justifying queer art, by Jonathon Austin

This is a repost of Jonathon Austin’s thesis, for the Master in Art Studies: Museum and Curatorial Studies, at the University of Porto, Faculty of Fine Arts. Thank you for sharing your point of view with us, Jonathon.

 

Why The Tate Gallery is right to put on a queer art exhibition.

Issues in justifying queer art
by Jonathon Austin

Abstract

Queer curating can be thought of as an attempt to dismantle heterosexist and normative concepts of society in contemporaneity embodied by the art museum. This means taking into consideration Art History’s discourse but also how history is being defined by values of present times. Sexual and gender dissidence is not usually taken into account in Art History as art and culture institutions remain rather conservative on the topic. One could even go to the length of saying one could attend a museum exhibition about Andy Warhol without learning about his sexuality. One could also claim that it is one irrelevant piece of information. Is identity irrelevant to the production of art? Are not sexual and gender identity part of one’s self construct? What or who determines its relevance to the production of art to the point of eliminating it from the historical discourse? Given the apparent irrelevance why does this seem to call forth a clash between outrage for censorship measures and free expression in a discussion still kept alive to this day? Queer art attempts to make the point that an alternative history can be told because Art History is generally uninterested in its issues. This is not to say that queer is the only account to be told in history’s discourse but it’s an account that has not been told for institutions keep choosing to maintain it that way. This paper finds its justification on the premise that a queer perspective is inviting to think of the multiple worlds in which art is produced and enjoyed and the difference of artistic expression in private and public forms. This paper is titled with the exact opposite premise of a famous newspaper article intended to perpass a queer art exhibition by The Tate Gallery as wrong and unnecessary. The arguments used here are made in an attempt to contradict the aforementioned article’s arguments while several past queer art exhibitions are brought up as support evidence to justify them.

 

Keywords: queer curatorship; Queer Theory; art; LGBTQI+

 

 

Following the celebration of half a century upon the decriminalization of male homosexuality in England, The Tate Gallery has announced its first LGBTQ-related British art exhibition with artworks ranging from 1867 to 1967. The Tate has given good grounds for the public to expect an exhibition where it will be possible to explore art from a century marked by the evolution of the concepts of gender and sexuality. From political to erotic themes, the artworks to be shown are to reveal a variety of personal stories from individuals whose identity and sense of belonging to a community were still in development as the LGBTQI+ acronym wasn’t yet recognized[1].

Views on why such an exhibition is wrong and unneeded have been expressed, this being a contested position in attempts to underline the necessity of the first exhibition of this kind to be organized by The Tate. The claim that our society has been losing the capacity to react to art freely because of its fixation on sexuality[2] calls indeed for the recognition that the concepts to be dealt with by this exhibition reflect the dominance in our society of the concepts of gender and sexual identity – as these are dominant traits in our thinking. In spite of this, these definitions are a cause for celebration since the decriminalization of male homosexuality (as lesbianism had never really been criminalized by the law) marks an important turning point in the history of LGBTQI+ people.

The Tate exhibition proposes a queer lens through which great art can be experienced by the public. This is a valid analysis perspective of art by artists who might have identified themselves with the recently reclaimed meaning of queer to different degrees. This means a queer lens can uncover lost or hidden meanings and stories in art from a time when queer feelings, desires and thoughts were repressed or hidden for the simple sake of survival. A queer aesthetic might even be exposed since the imagery and self-expression of queer identities were kept out of sight or concealed from normative society, thus allowing the possibility of a new and informed gaze upon issues around gender and identity politics of the 19th and 20th centuries. This is only one way through which art can be examined as different stories can be told according to the lens used to find meaning.

The relevance of grouping artists such as David Hockney, Duncan Grant, Francis Bacon and Keith Vaughan based on their sexual preferences was also questioned. Queer is not equivalent to homosexual as it refers to a much extensive spectrum of identity possibilities through variation of the normative concepts of gender and sexuality. Thus, queer art exhibitions or art queering exhibitions promote a critical standpoint to the institutionalized art exhibition as a symbol of hierarchical power and the ways by which cultural institutions act as education mediators and influence thinking and taste in the making of history’s discourse. This can better be understood if linked to the theories and practices defended by New Institutionalism and Institutional Critique. These theories promote a series of questioning tools to a better understanding of ways art institutions can become more inclusive of the society they fit in and represent – this marks a move from the classical museum towards the new politically and socially engaged art institution which is critical of its own functions and mechanisms of action. These also attempt to analyze the way naturally taken historic discourses are in fact socially and politically constructed to maintain a status quo.

The exhibition “neoqueer” at Seattle’s Center on Contemporary Art (2004) makes an effort to contest the idea that queer art is always regarded in association with sexuality. As stated by the curators, instead of specifically looking for homoerotism and queer content, the show focused on modern art, with quality and originality as key concepts – and not sexual orientation[3]. Although without a defining theme, or at least with an ambiguous one, the show asks the question of what it means to be LGBTQI+ and what role does sexuality play in an artist’s work – a necessary dialogue between queer artists and the public in order to dismantle preconceived ideas about queer art. The show does not portray the usual stories drawn up by queer shows that focus on the political statements of the previous century marked by the sexual revolution, nor does it solely present homoerotic drawings as art. Indeed, the collection of works selected by the curators range from the poetic to the provocative and the explicit. It tries to push queer beyond those boundaries, indicating an ever increasing trend towards “subtlety and individualism”[4].

Looking beyond the issue of whether Tate’s queer art exhibition should have gender and sexuality transgression as a worthy cause for celebration or should solely serve the purpose of reminding us of our obsession with these definitions[5], perhaps it would be more constructive when seen as a particular position or place that allows critical thinking about the paradigm of these issues given the symbolic date. By simply giving viewers a critical lens on why and under what circumstances gender and sexuality have become dominant in our thinking, this exhibition has a plausible reason to exist. Furthermore, it can help the public question the relationship between normative society and transgressive queer identity.

While trying to prove the point that this exhibition is wrong and unnecessary there’s a failure in questioning the definition of queer and the representation of queer in all its extension of identity possibilities. This is a common issue of art exhibitions titled and advertised as queer nowadays resulting in attempts to essentialize queer identity and stripping it down to the white homosexual figure. Queer art exhibitions are a way of depicting queer issues and experiences in an effort that stretches way beyond the necessity of making the institutional art world a more inclusive space. Museum studies and curatorship practice must be informed about Queer Theory in order to not pass on discourses perpetuating the construction of concepts such as gender and sexual identity based on normativity[6]. This is where an intersectional perspective must be adopted in order to fully explore the potential of queer identity without neglecting other categories and dimensions of experience and sensibility.

Categorizing a queer show as gay is biased and reductive. This is not a promotion of the condition of being gay or queer but instead a question of visibility. Being visible means being acknowledged as part of society and thus, requires being given the opportunity to be seen, heard and represented. Being visible means existing. Essentializing queer down to the homosexual figure means omitting a wide range of fleeting self-identification possibilities between the gender and sexuality spectrum.

Attempting to pass through this kind of exhibition as unneeded by arguing that everybody knows there are artists who are queer only adds to the institutional conservatism in the art world that accounts as part of the reason why queer identities still lack representation. A queer exhibition makes a contribution so that queer identities and content aren’t still only tolerated by normative society. Whenever consuming any form of culture people tend to look for signs of themselves and of a community in which they fit. Queer individuals, perhaps to a greater extent than average exhibition visitors who do not identify as queer, seek these spaces that celebrate their community, culture and history.

Exploring and digging up queer content in works of art is different from searching for a queer sensibility hidden behind imagery but a combined approach of the two would be rather interesting in making perceptible to the viewer the intricate complexity of queer identity through its aesthetics, sensibilities and content, and also its difficult relationship with the normative workings of society[7]. The viewer would be prompted to ask himself if some stories are queer in essence despite whether they portray or not queer content, and if some stories are not queer in essence (i.e. heteronormative) despite of whether or not queer content is portrayed. What then is queer content and queer sensibility?

There seems to exist understandable confusion as to what queer stands for in our days, with much prejudice arising from the distortion of its ambiguous meaning. It does not refer to an identity’s specific essence and thus, does not refer specifically and intrinsically to LGBT individuals. Queer can instead be thought of as the corporealization of an experience or sensibility which uses a discourse that intimately connects the personal/intimate and the social/public realms in an attitude of resistance and self-affirmation. Artistic production in this context aims the questioning and challenging of dominant ways of production and representation in art and it can ally itself with the subversion of traditional form, genre, structure and aesthetic in art. This approach consequently results in a form of provoking and experimenting which celebrates at the same time its transgressive characteristics – what keeps it from being absorbed into normative behavior and thinking.

In reply to the question of the validity in jumping to conclusions by labelling something or someone as queer, a queer perspective can be applied even to art produced by artists who do not specifically identify as queer. To queer or queering refers to this method which the institutional art world can apply to be more socially inclusive at least to the length of bringing visibility issues under the spotlight. Assuming this method is only concerned with exploring homosexual individuals and content in art is wrong as it concerns everything and everyone that characterizes as transgressive, as in not corresponding to societal norms in terms of sexual and gender identity and power structures based on that. Queering works of art not only contributes to making visible these individuals but can also provide viewers some initial support for understanding and accepting it. Furthermore, it can uncover hidden information that can be useful for another understanding of these works and artists. This does not mean ignoring already known traits of works as this method can additionally incorporate them into constructions of different interpretative meanings. A queer perspective on art does not neglect a work’s theme and try to replace it with the word queer – usually in association with sexuality. Moreover, it does not obliterate or deny previous values of an artwork but it can add more information to them. This is not to say that a queer lens is the only valid perspective an artist’s work is to be analyzed, interpreted or enjoyed.

A queer perspective can be sustained by drawing up Umberto Eco’s discussion about the open work of art. The notions of completeness and openness refer to the viewer’s reception of a work as an authorial construction of communicative engagement with the viewer[8]. Each individual can participate in dialogue with the piece through stimulus, being that this is dependent on their receptiveness, sensibility and capacity to respond. In this response, the viewer presents an overview of his own being, an amalgamation of beliefs, tastes, and prejudices. The original work’s meaning conceived by the artist is thus later adapted by the receptacle that is each individual with different perspectives formed by personal and cultural backgrounds.

Without invalidating any sense of original significance, these different approaches of viewing and understanding a work’s meaning make a work of art on the one hand open to numerous external susceptibilities of interpretation, and on the other a complete and unique product by the specificity imprinted on it by its maker. Assessing a work of art requires, not necessarily to the same degree, interpretation and performance, resulting in an intricate meeting between the viewer’s personal experience and the artist’s imprinted signifying connotations.

In this sense, a queer analysis of art proposes only one possible different approach which requires a new set of questions in finding meaning behind works. Queering, in a museum context, foresees the questioning of how museums collect. In curatorial practice, it questions the selection of the pieces altogether. In both cases, it makes the viewer wonder which narratives are depicted and which ones are omitted to construct a discourse or stimulate discussion[9].

Subjective perceptions of artworks by the viewer can be seen in parallel to the camp aesthetic. Although it is difficult to pin it down to a specific aesthetic, camp refers to a queer sensibility and sense of humor with its use of the theatrical and kitsch. Its discourse hasn’t always been so out and well integrated into popular culture as it is now with its beginnings reporting to a subversion of the mainstream and queer subjects being both the producers and consumers of this coded language. Camp was about elevating the low culture of the repressed, giving queer individuals opportunity to challenge representations in normative discourses. As dominant culture absorbed the camp aesthetic, a queer sensibility found its way to the core of mass popular entertainment. Although the glitter and diva-icons, as Gordon Hall points out, are essentializing images and direct references to queer, the camp sensibility hasn’t only been present in artistic expressions made by and for queers but extends itself to imagery with not necessarily queer innuendo.

Popular music by David Bowie and Cher – representing androgynous glam-rock and sense of style in the pop/dance music scene -, drag performance with satire and parody and the vogue dance style all make up references to burlesque entertainment and the MGM musical and film scene of the 40’s. Camp embodies this set sumptuosity, elaborate costumes, dazzling dance moves and stars such as Judy Garland – a timeless icon in queer culture. The spectacle element aiming the viewer’s fascination is adopted by camp to engage in dialogue with dominant culture, presenting resistance to normative values and representational systems mainly concerned with sexuality and gender[10]. Androgyny, drag performance and vogueing are praised for the ability to dismantle the gender normative concept while presenting exaggerated forms of both edges of the binary. Theatricality, entertainment and humor are weapons used to show reversed social norms about gender and sexual identity. Drag and camp illustrate and support Judith Butler’s definition of gender as a performance as opposed to a false idea of gender identity based on essence.

Camp is also an open work as its nature is dual, lending its features to products that are not conceived as such by their creators. This sensibility can be either imprinted onto objects when they are consumed by the public – such as Judy Garland’s Dorothee in The Wizard of Oz – or be deliberately created by artists – this being the case of Andy Warhol or drag performers. Camp is thus found in the experience of the viewer and in the object’s traits.

Warhol’s persona adopted the camp extravagant sensibility although contemporary discourses on the artist have often been evasive on the subject of his sexuality, omitting the influence it had in his work and in the queer climate of the 60’s [11]. Surely, a queer reading of Warhol doesn’t seem to be unconvincing if one takes the cover of the Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers depicting a crotch in skinny jeans, or the images of drag queens in Ladies and Gentlemen, or even the polaroids in Torsos and Sex Parts of men recruited in gay saunas having sex. Institutional and critical conservatism is rather obvious when works depicting queer content this explicit are not commonly shown and stay hidden in museum archives such as Warhol’s many experimental films – the most explicit being Blow Job showing an act of oral sex between two men and My Hustler with a plot of an intergenerational lust triangle involving three men[12].

Queer speaks of an unstable and precarious position towards dismantling normative constructions of the self[13]. This position is fundamentally a sensibility – not an essence of gender or sexual identity or any kind of essentialism[14] – engaged with the ways of being oneself. The aesthetic of the queer work of art is related to art production in the context of the civil liberation movements of the 70’s, and more prominently to feminist art. This means queer art reclaims experiences that aren’t “historically valued in the white-hetero-masculine system” [15] as a form of attack of political and social structures of gender and sexuality. With its unstable and undefinable nature, queer seeks to destabilize the sense of established natural being, the performance of everyday normative life, queering the status quo instead of reaffirming it[16]. Queer’s refusal to support and perpetuate societal norms and power structures strives for other possibilities to be constructed, which is why queer opens a whole dimension for new perceptions in art[17].

Artworks speak a lot about their makers and what significance they have received by their makers’ specificity. What if they could teach us a lesson about the ways we perceive? Gordon Hall claims they show how to see gender and bodies differently in a non-normative way, which means art could be a valuable resource for thinking about sexuality and gender even if imagery of queer experiences is not depicted[18]. Artworks are usually described as queer when portraying LGBTQI+ individuals, when produced by LGBTQI+ artists or when referencing to their culture by including tangible forms of queer aesthetics. Hall references characteristics that immediately refer the viewer’s mind to queer aesthetics, taking this phenomenon as an essentializing issue: “[…] the glitter problem. Or the leather problem. Or the pink-yarn, 1970s-crafts, iconic-diva, glory-hole, pre-AIDS-sexuality, post-AIDS-sexuality, bodies and body-parts, blood-and-bodily-fluids problem”[19]. This calls forward the question if it’s possible to find queer meaning in non-representation or pure formalism without any kind of overt queer context such as “dicks, vaginas, menstrual blood, references to Jean Genet, cum, anuses, bondage, surgery scars, reclaimed pronouns”[20].

Hall takes the difficult example of minimalist sculpture – as objects with no apparent resonance of gender in their form – in relation to queer content. If it’s possible to point out gender constructs in blank, monochrome and consistent objects it means a queer gaze of physicality and psychological associations can be applied to objects that are not queer in essence even when queer content is not portrayed – as minimalist sculpture appears completely devoid of narrative and symbolism. The only communication being made is through their placement in time and space – it’s the physicality of objects what allows intimate interaction with the viewer’s position and architectural setting.

Without wanting to claim that only queer art exhibitions are targets of controversy and censorship, they are no strangers at all to one another, despite this being an era where supposedly queer people are seen as equal. As expected, anything that disturbs the normative functioning and thinking of society always generates some critical backlash. The negative response, coming either from the public, institutions or patrons, seems stronger when political and religious views are put up against a wall to be challenged and objected.

Warhol’s mural 13 Most Wanted Men (1964) for the World’s Fair depicts prison photos of outlaw men in America. The work caused political controversy and was ultimately erased despite the artist’s already established status. The choice of subject challenged norms of taste in society and in the arts, containing coded language reporting to queer desire, thus being dissed by critics and censored by authorities. The images present the double meaning of most-wanted, as in criminals searched by the police and receptacles of desire. Moreover, this represents a form of outlaw desire if the gaze is male.

Three queer art exhibitions illustrate the sort of censorship that lies deep in the art world nowadays as it did back in 1964. The recent “Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture” (2010-2011) at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery was targeted by right-wing political and religious figures demanding control over the choice of works to be displayed. It was demanded the removal of Wojnarowicz’s video Fire In My Belly (1987). This piece, an excellent metaphor of the AIDS crisis, showed a crucifix covered in ants. The pressure was felt as the building was threatened to be closed in spite of the exhibition not being funded by public money. The video ended up being removed but the issue gave rise to a necessary discussion about what art was worthy of public funding and what kind of art was really displayed at public art institutions if not one censored within a controlled constructed discourse[21].

The slogan “silence = death”[22] doesn’t seem so far removed from the reality of nowadays as artworks and artists continue to be erased from sight to protect and not offend others[23]. One of the show’s curators, Jonathan Katz, has spoken about the urgency for “queer political advocacy” taking into consideration that this show had been numerous times rejected to be presented at various museums throughout the US[24].

Public funding of art exhibitions has some history of controversy. Regarding the issue of the AIDS crisis, the exhibition curated by Nan Goldin “Witnesses: Against our Vanishing” (1989), in part funded by public money, was caught up in great scandal created by political forces as well as the public. The exhibition catalogue criticized the lack of government and church funding for the AIDS cause, resulting in the cancellation of the grant given the public pressure to cut back on what kind of art should receive federal funds.

In comparison, “Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment” (1990)[25] has also seen a huge proportion of backlash against the homoerotic themed photographs it displayed. The CAC’s director was even legally charged for promoting obscenity in some of the show’s explicit photographs displaying S&M gay sex and child nudity[26]. The show, intended to be a retrospective view on the late openly homosexual artist’s work, ultimately came under the spotlight of the public, resulting in political debates about federal art funding. These debates mainly approached the topic of depiction of gay S&M imagery[27].

The exhibitions, even though different in terms of aim for public audience and location, suffered immense backlash from the public against queer content, resulting in chaos for political forces in managing the issue between funding and explicit content. Both exhibitions from last century, distant in two decades from “Hide/Seek”, show public rage toward queer art funding and is still present nowadays although a dramatic shift has been felt in public opinion with greater acceptance becoming the norm[28].

 

References (APA)

 

Bastos-Stanek, M. (2016). The Contested History of Queer Themes in American Art Exhibitions. Retrieved December 14, 2016, from https://umasshistory.wordpress.com/2016/07/11/the-contested-history-of-queer-themes-in-american-art-exhibitions/

 

Earnest, J. (2013). Contemporary Art and Queer Aesthetics. San Francisco Arts Quarterly. Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://sfaq.us/2013/10/contemporary-art-and-queer-aesthetics/

 

Eco, U. (1989). The Poetics of the Open Work. In The Open Work (pp. 1-23). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

Hall, G. (2013). Object Lessons: Thinking Gender Variance through Minimalist Sculpture. Art Journal, 72 (4).

 

Hirsch, F. (2011). Hide/Seek Curator Speaks Up at CAA. Art in America. Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/news/caa-jonathan-katz/

 

Jagose, A. (1996). Queer Theory: an introduction. New York: New York University Press.

 

Nguyen, V. T. (2013). Towards a Queer Intersectional Museology (Masters dissertation in Museum Studies). University of Sydney.

 

Prono, L (2007). Encyclopedia of gay and lesbian popular culture. Santa Barbara: Greenwood.

 

Sirkin, H. L. (2016). Why I defended Mapplethorpe’s ‘obscene’ ‘Perfect Moment’. The Washington Post. Retrieved December 15, 2016, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/06/10/why-i-defended-mapplethorpes-obscene-perfect-moment/

 

Steorn, P. (2010). Queer in the museum: Methodological reflections on doing queer in museum collections. Lambda Nordica, (3-4), 119-122. Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://www.lambdanordica.se/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/2010-34-Steorn-Museum.pdf.

 

Street-Porter, J. (2016). The Tate Gallery is wrong to put on a ‘queer’ art exhibition. Retrieved December 05, 2016, from http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/tate-gallery-wrong-put-on-queer-art-exhibition-a6996351.html

 

Tate (2016). Queer British Art 1861–1967 – Exhibition at Tate Britain | Tate. Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/queer-british-art-1861-1967

 

Trescott, J. (2010). After Smithsonian exhibit’s removal, banned ant video still creeps into gallery. The Washington Post. Retrieved December 14, 2016, from http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/12/06/AR2010120607328.html

[1] Tate (2016).

[2] Street-Porter, J. (2016).

[3] Potterf, T. (2004).

[4] Potterf, T. (2004).

[5] Street-Porter, J. (2016).

[6] Nguyen, V. T. (2013).

[7] Hall, G. (2013).

[8] Eco, U. (1989).

[9] Steorn, P. (2010).

[10] Prono, L (2007). P. 52

[11] Prono, L (2007). P. 278.

[12] Prono, L. (2007). Pp. 276-277.

[13] Jagose, A. (1996). Pp. 76-77.

[14] Attribution to each gender of a fixed essence taken as natural, which is determined by biological, physical and psychological traits.

[15] Earnest, J. (2013).

[16] Earnest, J. (2013). Reference to Judith Butler’s theory of performance of gender in which gender is seen as a performance and thus, an exteriorization of identity through behavior and physical appearance. This performance of gender can perpetuate societal constraints that support the gender binary system – as in taking on a role from the binary to reproduce and reaffirm it.

[17] Jagose, A. (1996). P. 76-77.

[18] Hall, G. (2013). Pp. 46-57.

[19] Hall, G. (2013). P. 47.

[20] Hall, G. (2013). P. 47.

[21] Trescott, J. (2010).

[22] Reference to ACT UP’s 1987 activist project that draws a parallel between the governmental indifference toward the AIDS crisis and the Nazi period concerning the oppression the homosexual community has suffered.

[23] Bastos-Stanek, M. (2016).

[24] Hirsch, F. (2011).

[25] Contemporary Arts Center Cincinnati.

[26] Sirkin, H. L. (2016).

[27] Bastos-Stanek, M. (2016).

[28] Bastos-Stanek, M. (2016)

HCB Award for photography projects. Deadline: April 29, 2017.

Presented by the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, the HCB Award supports the creation of a photography project with a 35 000 € grant, which could not be achieved without this help. It is intended for an artist who has already completed a significant body of work, close to the documentary approach. The candidate must be supported by an institution — museum, gallery, independent curator, publisher, etc.

 

CALENDAR

April 1 – 29, 2017 : application submissions at the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson

April 29 : application deadline (date as per postmark)
End of June 2017 : HCB Award ceremony at the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson

http://www.henricartierbresson.org

 

Finnish Museum of Photography exhibitions Call for 2018

Call for artists: The Finnish Museum of Photography’s Project Space exhibitions in 2018
The Project space is intended for exhibitions and projects that use photography or other lens-based media as tools for art or research. The space shows stimulating exhibitions by both fresh talents and more established artists.

Photography professionals and students as well as visual artists making photographic art can apply. Applications can also be submitted in the name of workgroups.

 

How to apply?

Application

The application must consist of a single pdf file. However, if the exhibition includes video, you can add a link to it instead of sending the video file as an attachment.

The pdf should contain the following elements:

1) A cover page with the name of the applicant (and/or the workgroup), e-mail address and a phone number (country code included).

2) Application letter that gives brief but complete details of the proposed exhibition (max 2 x A4). The letter should involve information of who is/are the applicant/s, what kind of an exhibition you would like to have and, if possible, what kind of sections does the exhibition consist of. It is okay to not have an existing exhibition when applying – just be as precise as possible with your explanations of what kind of an exhibition you’re planning.

3) Include a portfolio containing photos of the works to be in the planned exhibition. Indicate each work’s year of completion, dimensions, mode of production etc., and include any information that will help give a picture of the exhibition as a whole. In case the works for the planned exhibition have not been produced yet, please send some reference material of your earlier works.

If you are planning to show moving image, please add a link where we can see the work.

4) Include your full contact details and your CV to your application. If the exhibition is produced by a group, please include everyone’s CVs.

Name the pdf file as “Projekti2018_YOURNAME”. The size of the pdf file should not exceed 10MB.

Applications for the year 2018 should be sent to finnishmuseumofphotography@gmail.com by 12PM on Wednesday, May 31, 2017.

Please write Projekti2018 as the headline of the message.

We will send you a confirmation e-mail once we have received your application. Please contact museum’s curator Maria Faarinen ( maria.faarinen@fmp.fi ) if you have not heard back from us with a week from sending your application.

 

What does the Museum provide for exhibitors?

The Museum provides exhibition space, free, for 7-8 weeks. Applicants can indicate a preferred exhibition period, but the Finnish Museum of Photography reserves the right to decide on the order of the exhibitions. There are five exhibition periods during the year 2018.

The Project space has a floor area of 50 m² and a ceiling 4.5 m high (see floor plan).

The Museum offers exhibition installers a fixed production grant of 400 euros. The Artist is responsible of other production costs. The Museum provides help with installation and dismantlement, exhibition supervision, and opening arrangements. The artist should be personally present during the construction and dismantling of the exhibition.

The Museum is responsible for exhibition lighting and cleanliness during the exhibition period. The Museum has a limited amount of technical equipment available for loan to artists. The Museum is not able to provide any audio or video equipment for the exhibitions.

The Museum provides insurance for the construction, dismantlement and exhibition periods. The Museum does not insure works during transportation.

The Museum provides publicity, publishes exhibition details and sends press releases and posts information on the Museum’s website and social media channels.

The Museum does not provide paper invitations or postage. Artists who make and post invitations at their own expense can use the museum’s geographic mailing list if they wish.

Exhibition installers are responsible for transportation of works and for their own travel costs.

 

projekti-tilaEN
Project Space wall measurements. 

472px_Projekti
Project space.

The decision-making process

The applications are reviewed by the Finnish Museum of Photography’s exhibition team: Chief Curator Tiina Rauhala and Curator Maria Faarinen.

All applicants will be informed of the curators’ decision by e-mail by June 23, 2017. The selected projects will also be published on the museum’s website.

 

Further details

Send your application to:  finnishmuseumofphotography@gmail.com

Further exhibition details:
Chief Curator Tiina Rauhala: +358-(0)50 432 7562, tiina.rauhala@fmp.fi
Curator Maria Faarinen, +358-(0)50 400 9041, maria.faarinen@fmp.fi

One Week Left to participate in Latin American Photo of the Year Contest

All photographs entered in the contest must have been taken within the last 24 months before the beginning of the contest, with the exception of those in the category, Nuestra Mirada which has no time restriction. Series have a maximum of 10 photos. It is essential that all photos have the photographer’s name and a caption within the digital archive.

1. Daily Life (Photographic Singles) — A candid, un-posed photograph that documents the human experience celebrates life or chronicles a cultural trend. Respect for the dignity of the subject is important.

2. Daily Life (Photographic Series) — A series of un-posed photographs that document the human experience celebrates life or chronicles a cultural trend. Respect for the dignity of the subject is important. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. Summarize the story in a paragraph under “File Info” in the first photograph of the story.

3. News (Photographic Singles) — A photograph from a news event or social issue for which planning was possible or a photograph of a breaking news or unplanned event.

4. News (Photographic Series) — A series of photographs from a news event or social issue for which planning was possible or of a breaking news or unplanned event. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. Summarize the story in a paragraph under “File Info” in the first photograph of the story.

5. Portraits (Photographic Singles) — A photograph of a person that reveals the essence of the subject’s character.

6. Portraits (Photographic Series) — A series of portraits of individuals or groups of individuals that attempt to reveal the essence of their character. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. Summarize the story in a paragraph under “File Info” in the first photograph of the story.

7. Sports (Photographic Singles) — A photograph that captures the peak action of individual or team sports or a photograph that increases understanding and appreciation for individual and team sports or celebrates the role athletics play in the lives of amateur and/or professional athletes and fans.

8. Sports (Photographic Series) — Picture stories or essays that capture sports peak action or increase understanding and appreciation of sports or celebrate the roles of athletes and sports fans. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. In each caption field, very briefly summarize the story in addition to providing picture-specific caption information.

9. Indigenous people, Traditions & Religions (Photographic Series) – Picture stories or essays that document the cultural richness and challenges faced by indigenous peoples but also the way in which traditions and religion mark our societies. This category ranges from the combination of different beliefs in traditional festivals to the more serious problems that affect the native peoples. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. In each caption field, very briefly summarize the story in addition to providing picture-specific caption information.

10. Migration, Refugees and Trafficking (Photographic Series) – Picture stories or essays that document the impact and consequence of human migrations between countries or regions, the plight of displaced persons and refugees, and human trafficking. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. In each caption field, very briefly summarize the story in addition to providing picture-specific caption information.

11. Women in Society (Photographic Series) — This category has been promoted by the Diputación de Barcelona. A story or essay that documents the situation of women in Iberoamerica. It includes a wide range of issues such as women’s employment opportunities, gender equality, violence against women and femicide, expectations of beauty, and the new roles of women. Respect for the people photographed is essential. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. In each caption field, very briefly summarize the story in addition to providing picture-specific caption information.

12. The Future of Cities (Photographic Series) – A story or essay that deals with urbanization processes in Iberoamerica. This is a topic that requires reflection on the challenges faced by people from all socio-economic groups. This category includes urban themes such as public space design, growth, rural development, public transport, as well as social issues such as security, inclusion, the extremes of wealth and poverty, the situations of children and the elderly, or the challenges that threaten the middle class. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. In each caption field, very briefly summarize the story in addition to providing picture-specific caption information.

13. Multimedia (Short Form Videos) — A narrative video lasting less than 5 minutes.

14. Multimedia (Long Form Videos) — A narrative video lasting between 5 and 20 minutes.

15. Multimedia (Websites) – An interactive site or webpage that offers a powerful visual story using visual media such as video, still photography, design and infographics in a journalistic context.

16. The Best Photography Book (Books) — The books submitted to the competition must contain documentary photography and must have been published in the 24 months prior to the close of the competition. Images can be the work of one or several photographers. After registration, send a copy of the book as soon as possible to:

POY Latam
House Amèrica Catalunya
C / Còrsega, 299, mezzanine
08008 Barcelona
T: +34 932 380 661

17. Nuestra Mirada Memory and Identity Award (Photographic Series) – This special category rewards documentary or artistic photographs that reflect on who we are and where we come from. This category is the only category in which photos may have been taken at any time and also the only one that accepts real or digital manipulations, provided they are conceptually justified. Creativity, concept, aesthetics, depth and artistic or documentary value will be of special importance. It is forbidden to enter work that has already been submitted to previous POY Latam contests. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. In each caption field, very briefly summarize the story in addition to providing picture-specific caption information.

18. Carolina Hidalgo Vivar Environment Award (Photographic Series) – This special category rewards a photographic essay that expands our understanding of or appreciation for nature. A wide range of issues will be considered, for example, the consequences of mining or industry, the multiple ways in which humans relate to their environment, the exaltation of nature’s beauty or documentation of its destructive power. This essay honors the memory of Carolina Hidalgo Vivar, a young landscape architect who deeply loved nature. Story entries must have between 2 and 10 pictures. In each caption field, very briefly summarize the story in addition to providing picture-specific caption information.

19. The Iberoamerica Photographer of the Year Award (Photographic Portfolios) This special category is open to all photographers. Present a maximum of forty (40) photographs. A portfolio must be diverse and must include at least four individual photographs and two photographic stories. Individual photos within the portfolio should not be repeated in the picture stories. Organize the portfolio with individual photos first, followed by the picture stories. Insert a black image (.jpg) at the beginning of each picture story to separate them. No text should be included in these black images.

Photographers are encouraged to submit portfolio photographs in other categories for judges to become familiar with the work, but POY Latam will not move photos from one category to another. If you want to participate in other categories you must submit duplicate files. All photographs entered in the portfolio must have been taken within the last 24 months before the beginning of the contest.

http://www.poylatam.org/en/

Repost – The Photographer’s Guide to Instagram Hashtags

Check out The Photographer’s Guide to Instagram Hashtags from PhotoShelter and Feature Shoot. An interesting survey with good tips.

I copied some of their conclusions here. You can download the full guide at photoshelter.com

We’ve seen that editors do use
hashtags to find new work, and regularly seek
new emerging talents via popular and niche
Instagram feature pages. Many photographers have been
hired, sent on assignments or sold prints due to Instagram
publicity, and there are many images which have the
potential to get this kind of attention if promoted well.
Across the board it seems that feature page curators, inundated
with new submissions every day, often judge images
based on the thumbnail—so this must be striking. A
combination of both submittable and searchable hashtags
does help you get more exposure, as both have their audiences.
Feature page curators also appreciate hashtags that
provide extra information about an image, for instance
those which communicate the camera used, the format,
the location. Many also explicitly ask for geolocation.
Below are a few further reflections on how to continue to
promote your photography using hashtags on Instagram.
How many hashtags should I use and
where should I put them?

While Instagram sets a 30-hashtag limit, most photographers
don’t adhere to this. Too many hashtags
can overwhelm users and discourage them from
checking out the rest of your profile. For this reason,
photographers who have already established large followers
tend not to use any. But you will want to use
hashtags if you’re still growing an audience and want
to draw interest beyond your existing followers. Some
photographers opt to include hashtags at the end of
the caption, is there is one, and sometimes these can
be divided by a “//“ for clarity. For aesthetic preferences, others put this information below the image as a
first comment. Either way, it will help your photograph
reach new people.

Hashtags to avoid
It is advisable to steer clear of spammy hashtags such as
#follow4follow which might get you followers, though
are likely to deter photo editors, fellow photographers
and photography enthusiasts.
Larger vs smaller submittable feature pages
This is really your call. Feature pages with larger followings
will without a doubt get you more exposure
should your photograph be selected, though these are
also more competitive due to the high number of submissions.
Smaller feature pages with a niche interest are
less competitive and may be worth applying to if they
have a particular aesthetic which you like, or if there
are editors or writers among their followers. To increase
your chances of gaining exposure, it pays to use hashtags
from a variety of feature pages, big or small.

How to find new Instagram hashtags
With time, some submittable hashtags become too
competitive, cease activity or have a change in artistic
direction. Fortunately it is always possible to find new
hashtags. Scouring the profiles of Instagram influencers,
photographers whose profiles are increasingly popular
or seeing who editors are following can help you discover
new feature pages. There are new ones cropping up all
the time. Some searchable hashtags become too overloaded
with spam and so sometimes it is worth playing with words to find new hashtags which still appeal to
people working within the medium and/or genre.
A note on the future of hashtags
That last point brings us onto another question; if
some searchable hashtags are becoming saturated with
spam or unrelated photographs, what is the future of
hashtags? It can be frustrating to search for what you
want via Instagram only to find images that are completely
irrelevant. More and more, editors and writers
are turning to submittable feature pages to get a curated
selection of photographs that have been qualitychecked.
Whether the hashtag method of submission
is sustainable, or more feature pages turn to email submission
is at this point unclear.

Final words
Beyond your use of hashtags, it is important to have
a consistent, quality feed, post regularly, and have an
interesting profile to keep your followers interested.
Architect and architectural photographer Jeroen van
Dam has been featured by big hubs, though has found
that what is most important for him is interacting
with other people on Instagram. “In that way they
are more likely to comment back and start following
you” he emphasizes. People who like your style and
are interested in the stories you have to tell will keep
checking up on you. Instagram is at times a reciprocal
platform—new followers are more likely to find your
page if you regularly engage with others, be it by liking
or commenting on their images.
Once you’re satisfied with the number of followers or
interest you can always opt to drop hashtags to get the
cleaner look that Instagram influencers usually go for.
Instagram is fun, and can also be a powerful tool for
promoting your photography.

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