Category Archives: -> Posts by language

English, Español, Deutsch, Français, Català

LOADING FESTIVAL. Deadline: Aug. 23, 2019

The submissions are open to send projects in the broad field of the image, such as video art, art installations, and photography, highlighting the narrative. Once intended to have a correlation between sound and image in the video experimentation.

What the projects have to be about

At Loading nothing is finished, in the festival, everything begins, everything changes but nothing is closed. It cannot be presumed, it cannot be boasted, it shows processes and fragments to grow and improve. In this way, public, creators, institutions and all participating agents are enriched by the knowledge, debate, and sharing of partner processes.

 

Selection criteria

Each submission will be evaluated according to:

• Quality

• The innovative character in terms of discourse, format, process, etc.

• The processes and conceptualization of ideas

 

Jury

All the projects will be reviewed by Loading Fest.

 

 

Documentation to be delivered

Conditions of participation

• Title & Project summary (400 max. character)

• Artist’s name

• Real name of the artist or social reason of the collective

• Email

 

Photography projects

• 10 to 15 images, 2000x2000px, in jpeg, 72 dpi, separated files, named “artist name_project title_photo number”

 

Video projects

• Video files max 5min, in MOV/MP4, 1920×1080, named “name of the artist_project title”

Send everything in a zip file until the 23rd of August 2019 to loadingopencall@gmail.com

 

Click here for the Legal bases

Summer Special: Meet the Captain.

As a special delight for the hot season, we are happy to serve you a freshly squeezed summer cocktail on deck, with the Captain of this vessel. Please enjoy

“Moritz Neumüller in conversation with Inanna Riccardi” 

An in-depth and yet easy-going interview conducted by the Italian researcher Inanna Riccardi with curator, educator and writer Moritz Neumüller, on museums in the age of participation, the relationship of photography with visual culture, and the role of technology for making art more accessible to all.

 

 

Inanna Riccardi: From looking at your website and onthe internet, one gets the impression that your career has involved a lot of Do-it-yourself initiatives. How would you describe this process?

 

I am trained as an art historian, I studied Art History and then Economics in two different universities and am specialized in photography, which happened almost by chance. People quite often ask if I’m a photographer, but I’m not!

 

I think this is because, until recently, there was no photographic education apart from becoming a photographer, so photographers turned their professionalskills to curatorship or as experts working within the museum world. In my case, I had to cultivate my interest in photography mostly through self-study. That started with me being a research assistant at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. It was during my PhD studies, and I spent one day per week in the photo department. During my time there I learnt a lot! They offered me a job afterwards but I decided to go back to Austria to finish my PhD, hoping to be able to work at MoMA later on.

 

IR: MoMA is definitely a great place to learn, but then9/11 happened. How did it affect your progress?

 

Going back to New York wasn’t really an option anymore: MoMA relies heavily on private donations andafter 9/11 these donations decreased, partly because everybody donated to the firemen. That meant that the museum had to lay off part of their staff, and the foreigners were the first ones to go. I therefore had to re-think my plans for the future.

I had always wanted to see Cuba before it changed and I always wanted to go there not as a tourist but to live. So I got in touch with the photographic museum, the FotoTeca, and proposed a project about Afro-Cuban culture and heritage, in particular Santeria.

 

IR: That’s a very anthropological topic, funnily enoughsuggested by an outsider. Was it the first time someone suggested the topic?

 

Yes, in fact there had never been a photographic exhibition about Santeria. That was due to political reasons: for many years religious practices were forbidden or not really looked at, while photography had a very important social and political role, as a sort of‘propaganda’. Photographs were used to show the achievements of the government and the new revolutionary state.

My first curatorial project, as you said, was only half on photography and the other half was on anthropology. I therefore asked my cousin, who is an anthropologist and filmmaker, to help me. As a result of this collaboration we created a documentary film and a book. That was kind of a big project for someone who had just started! But everything I learnt was by doing, by finding out for myself. I made a lot of mistakes and I asked for help a lot.

 

 

 

IR: So Latin American photography seems to have drawn you to live in Spain…

 

In a way, I guess you are right. After that experience, I found myself in Madrid, and by chance I started working on an exhibition on Latin American photography.

We worked on this project for a year. It was shown in Barcelona and Madrid at the same time and that was interesting for me, I think it was the first time I’d heard that one exhibition could be shown in two places. Only afterwards did I find out that the “Family of Man” exhibition did the same thing in the 50s and 60s. Then I worked at Photo España, Spanish’s bigger photo festival. After that I moved to Barcelona, ten years ago, and I have been working as a freelancer since then.

In recent years I have been specializing in photobooks and my other field of specialization is accessibility to art.

 

IR: It’s interesting that you mention accessibility, in a world where inequality and the subsequent access to resources is discussed. How can museums and art institutions in general switch the static power relationship among the audience and create more equal conditions?  

 

Historically museums have fostered a sort of devotion and reverence towards the artwork and the artists. If we think about the structure of the building, most museums are located at the top of steps, they resemble Roman and Greek temples, so the audience has to climb up to the altar to worship the artworks.

However, I think museums should be generating new practices for looking at society. In this regard, big institutions such MoMA have been pioneers.

I was working at MoMA when I saw, for the first time, a tour for blind people, which consisted in them touching some sculptures. Everyone in the group of participants had a smile from ear to ear, they felt that they were part of the art.

That made a big impression on me and influenced my way of working.

Within this context digital developments can help museums to open their doors and become more inclusive.

I am thinking of Smartify, for example, which is an app that uses image recognition to retrieve information about the artwork.

 

IR: Technology, at its extreme, seems, in some museums, to have become the only alternative to the accepted way of exhibiting. I refer to the increasing attention given toVirtual Reality. However, I believe that there is the need for creating more inclusive practices for curating, which take into account different perceptions and experiences of the world and value them, maybe to the point of generating ad hoc projects for specific target groups.

 

I investigate these alternatives with “ArteConTacto”(which can be translated as Art with Touch, or Art Contact), a project and a platform which aims at providing a sensorial experience of the art by using allthe senses like touch, hearing… The idea that lies behind it is to make art accessible to everybody!

“ArteConTacto” adapts exhibitions for people who are normally excluded from the art. The strategy is to include fragile or excluded groups from day one, by using technology to our advantage, to bridge the gaps between the material and the audience.

In 2009 I used 3D printing and tactile materials for the first time as a tool to adapt an exhibition for blind people. One piece we adapted was an untitled photograph by Lotte Hendrich-Hassmann from 1982, which was taken during a performance. The picture represents the artist covered by some sort of cloth, which is wrapped all around the body. We made a full-body scan of a person in the same posture and had it printed at the Technological University of Vienna, in a 3D sculpture of approx. 30 cm high. In this way the blind could actually touch the piece. The most interesting part was taking something out of the frame and placing it in the space so people could use it.

 

IR: Have you have tried to work outside the European context?

 

In Tunisia I did another interesting project: I contacted people from the association for the blind and asked them,what would you like to see, if you could see? And some people said a certain building in the city, someone said a plane, someone else said a mosque. I asked them if they knew how to get to these places, and they said yes, more or less. I asked them if they had ever had a tactile map of the city, and since they had never had one I created it for them. I took a map of the city, glued it to a board and made the big streets with transparent glue. I gave it to them and they had the first tactile plan of the city.

One of the participants said he wanted to visit the football stadium, so we went there. He walked to the goal because he was very interested in experiencing the distance between the penalty spot and the goal he knew about it and wanted to experience it for himself. We produced models of the buildings they were interested in. We went to the shoemaker at the bazar and we designed the airplane, for example, on the rubber material he uses for making sandals. Then we placed the cut out on a board. The process was similar for the mosque and other important buildings.

Back at home, we also made a tactile photograph of one of the other buildings and sent it to Tunisia. It was exhibited and then donated to blind’s association.

 

IR: Being an Austrian living in Barcelona and working within the European and extra-European contexts, you could be seen as a good example of the embodiment of different cultures and different ways of working. Howdoes this personal aspect play a role in your practice as a curator?

 

I think art is a very culturally framed concept. For example, a huge part of the population has a different opinion about what art should be compared to people who work within the field. I am referring to cultural products, which can be considered points of interest or tools of interaction for and with somebody.

 

IR: It seems that you particularly enjoy working with and for blind people, who have a completely different understanding of and approach to art…

 

They are an interesting case study from my perspective: I was trained as a visual person in visual culture, but they do not have access to that aspect, so there is a big gap.

In addition I go to museums all the time, since it is partof my job, so it’s also partly a duty for me.

Blind people, instead, are generally afraid to go to museums because they feel they do not belong there, that there is nothing for them, that they will feel stupid.

I am interested in the art and its story, while blind people are generally interested in many aspects of an art experience, such as the materiality of sculpture, or the exhibition space itself, or the way you are able to communicate the story around, behind or about an artwork. They also spend longer time experiencing each artwork compared to the general public.

 

IR: They experience art in a pre-consumer society way, so we can we can learn a lot from their way of approaching art.

 

That’s the reason why I’m so interested in “special” target groups. My projects are always a give and take, learn and teach. And as a by-product, everybody experiences something new and they enjoy themselvesthrough art.

 

IR: Art for everybody, without simplification and reduction, is an aspiration that many institutions have. At the same time we see a more impatient and fragmented young generation, in which smartphones are playing a crucial role in connecting them to others who are physically distant but with whom they share similar interests.

 

I see technology and its use, mostly among youngsters,as an opportunity to invite people in and get more out of the art, instead of obstructing the art experience.

It’s all about how to use what’s out there, and how to navigate the generational changes in an efficient way for museums.

For example, the younger generation also has a tendency not to listen during guided tours in the museum, but they listen to their phones and they look at their phones, so if you have the chance to use that technology you can reach those were previously unreachable.

I think technology can be used to open the cultural field and reach new audiences.

 

IR: However, you must admit that technology also has a negative side, like cinemas loosing their audience because of Netflix.

 

That’s true but we can’t stop time, meaning technological progress. However, these people are still looking at something that can be considered a cultural product.

That opens the discussion about what and how products become cultural and where the line is that marks that difference. If we include these other new cultural products in the pallet of things that you can do, engage with, then culture has not lost anyone. People are now becoming DJs and VJs for their own homes, their community, their followers, and they are much more active in that sense than people who grew up with unidirectional mass media such as TV. Maybe younger generations are even more engaged, more educated, more adult users of technology and cultural products.

 

IR: Another excluded target group is the elderly, who probably have difficulties relating to technology and might be more interested in conventional exhibitions. How can technology tackle these issues?

 

Technology applied to generate tactile reliefs and 3Dprinting are definitely big resources for including this group. With age, most people begin losing their senses, and have impaired vision, so they can only see somethings. Therefore, multi-sensorial experiences, which include for example listening to a story, are an interesting way of including this audience.

At the same time, they do not need to understand the technological process behind the experience.  

Moreover, I see this group as a source of inspiration: they love to tell stories, for example about the war they foughtin, an experience which many of us haven’t had. In that way they can still relate to and meet our art experience with their experience.

 

IR: Talking about technology as a tool of inclusion rather than exclusion, the internet has definitely created a revolutionary way of gathering information, and has brought part of our world closer. How have you used this potential in your practice?

 

In 2010 I created The Curator Ship”, which was generated out of necessity to filter and share information that reached me about opportunities for artists and curators.

I used to get a lot of emails about grants, residencies, exhibition proposals, portfolio reviews, calls for participation, and so on, which I forwarded to the people in my network who I thought might be interested in them.

But it came to a point where it took up too much of my time, so I decided to put it on a website so that everybody knows what I know.

 

I filter what I receive by email and I select what I find interesting enough for me. Moreover, when the initiative is open for international applicants but in only in one language, I translate it and put it up there as the call: here is the summary in English and the description, and it says it’s open so you can apply just by running it through Google translate.

Then people can apply, it doesn’t say anywhere it has to be in a certain language, so just send your stuff in English. I guess I have in this way opened many opportunities for the international public.

 

IR: It seems to me that you are a many-faceted professional within the art scene, who tries to learn everything he can and wears several hats! Where and how is your energy mostly used these days?  

 

My contribution is that I know nearly nothing about everything, and I’ve always tried to be the one in the room who knows the least so I can learn the most.

You cannot really get famous with that kind of thing, you get more famous and wealthy if you do one thing and you do it really well. But I am happily accepting this. Whenever I’ve had too much of something I’ve backed out and done something else, or tried to do many things at the same time.

 

I work with some mediums that interest me a lot: performance, video, photography, photobooks, filmmaking, documentary. I think that what they have in common is this strange relationship to the world outside, if you want to call it the real world, even if these days it’s becoming more and more unreal and surreal. But these kinds of reflections on the world, on themes that surround us, in this kind of dialogue with what is going on out there, is what interests me, when I curate, when I teach, when I write and when I do projects!

This interview was performed via skype on 22.11.2018

 

Photobookshow Call. Deadline: Sept. 1, 2019

We are very pleased to announce that Photobookshow will be taking part in International Photography Symposium “NIDA 2019. Meeting Photography” this September in Lithuania.

When

11th to the 14th of September 2019

Where

Amber gallery-museum. Pamario str. 20 Nida, Lithuania

Submissions Open

We invite submissions of all printed formats where photography is its main focus from handmade dummies, one-off published book, zines and photographic newspapers.

Our aim is to showcase a wide demographic of photobooks currently being produced around the world. The deadline for the Open Call is 1st of September 2019.

SUBMIT A PHOTOBOOK

Supported by International Photography Symposium NIDA.

Exhibition Call. Demographic Changes. Deadline: Oct. 30, 2019

Call for Art Exhibition in Berlin. Curator Dorit Jordan Dotan
The triangle between cultural conquest, assimilation and integration

Demographic changes affect global and local politics, economies, urban affairs and day to day life.

For some of those who were lucky to be born in a stable, strong, democratic country, it is hard to accept those changes. It creates fear of job loss and the changing of familiar local culture.  Immigrants or refugees face changes adapting to social behavior codes. History forewarns what can happen when hate, fear and a sense of threat grows among and between people coming from different cultures, who now share space.

Making peace within oneself – coexisting with oneself and others – can be achieved in many ways. Art can create a safe, public place to express and explore these clashes of culture.

Does acceptance of those different from us always result in complete assimilation?

Is cultural conquest inevitable?

Is integration the goal, or the compromise?

How do we go from tolerating to tolerance?

Exhibition about Demographic Changes, will take place in Berlin, Germany. The curator will open her artist residency project with a group exhibition from the USA and the EU. The exhibition will be on view in early 2020, located at the Institut für Alles Mögliche Studio/Storefront Gallery in Berlin, Germany.

Opening Event and Gallery Talk:  to be announced.

Selected artists from the USA will ship their work to the USA, which must include a prepaid return shipping label.

Selected artists from the EU will ship or deliver to Berlin, Germany, which must  include a prepaid return shipping label.

Subjects may include but are not limited to :

  • I am an Immigrant

  • Mixed Marriage

  • Cultural Differences

  • Demographic Changes

  • The Immigrant’s Suitcase

  • Ethnic Clothing and Appearance

  • Acceptance

Please submit up to 3 images, 72 DPI.

Longest side no more than 1000 Pixels. Max file size: 5MB.

Media:  Paintings and Drawings, Photography, Digital art, Mixed media, Printmaking, Comics. * Video Art – Berlin artists only.

Final art must not exceed 18″ on the longest side.

Work on paper/canvas/textile and un-framed only.

Entry Deadline: 30 October, 2019

Artists will be notified by November, 20, 2019.

USA: Accepted works must arrive in the US by January 5 -7,  2020.

EU: Accepted works must arrive in Berlin by February 4 -6, 2020.

Work will be returned in May 2020. No insurance will be provided.

  • Application fee is $30 for up to three images of work

  • Artist statement up to 150 words

  • Short bio and link to website/portfolio

  • Image info needed: Title / Medium / Size / Year

Link: www.doritjordan.com/call-for-art

Exclusive for subscribers of the Curator Ship: A limited number of artists who experience financial hardship may be exempt from paying the full entry fee; please send an email to request a fee of $15: fan.omanut@gmail.com

Call for Participation. Book project. Deadline: 30.09.2019

This is a call by Aldobranti, an artist whose work centres on a conceptual photography often approached through performance.

He looks for other contributors to his book project, ‘Critical Moss, making Art Work outside the Metropolitan Bubble’:

The title of this project * is a play on words, artists may be like stones, rolling to places beyond their original intention, far from the critical buzz afforded by art school crits, first nights, gallery visits and rapid transit systems. The research will seek to identify methodologies  for artists in isolated settings to ‘kickstart’ their practice — absent a critical mass of fellow artists.

It seems obvious that Art exists in a setting of dialogue. In its viewing, its reception the dialogue exists between the viewer and the artwork and in most cases is beyond the control of its creator. In its inception however, there is a wider conversation between the Artist , the artwork and the context in which the Artist finds herself. This wider conversation may be a rehearsal for a later reception dialogue, to make the artwork fit for purpose, working on the question ‘what is the artist trying to say‘ through the artwork as mouthpiece

This question may not have an easy answer during a great part of the preparation. A figurative work can perhaps be judged in the extent to which it evokes the subject matter. An abstract artwork may be self justified by its adherence to a formal working method but overall a significant factor in addressing the above question is a discussion formed as words and not mark making. No longer representing things, rather making work about ideas must surely necessitate realising some [small] part of the idea as words.

Thus I am arguing that the context, mentioned above is found as words, interior or exterior to the artist. Art is not made in a Silence. Outside of a metropolitan ‘bubble’ access to a critical context may not be freely available and the purpose of my research is to understand fellow artists’ response to this shortfall both in their words and in executed artwork. In particular I should like to reach out to and include practitioners for whom a material art object may not be the objective.

To thank you for your assistance I shall make a casebound, hardback book of your contributions. The book will feature 20 (approx. ) artists with images and facing text. Each selected participant will receive a free copy and further copies will be made available at cost. The book will have an ISBN, deposited at the British Library and the Legal Deposit Libraries.

Initially, complete the form below, including  an image and an account (200 words) to reflect your work and working method  with a URL for other relevant work. You must confirm that you own copyright in the image and text. With your permission, it could be helpful if I or a fellow researcher might conduct a short telephone interview if we intend to print your contribution.

Please also say how you found this call.

On progress the selected image must be available in hi-res (2500 x 2500 pixels) — the artist will at all times retain control of copyright both of image and text. The text of the book will be published in English, if not your first language the editor may be able to help with language issues.

https://zfrmz.com/SXDSIQZzQ72vKF6s4D9F

Any Questions or Problems with this form please email on the address below
Deadline 30/09/2019

Keywords : art, book, isolation, participation, publication

Email : aldobranti@gmail.com  .

* English Proverb “A rolling stone gathers no moss” — decisive action must be taken to avoid stagnation

CV

An regularly updated list of events and exhibitions can be found at https://aldobranti.org/#!info/bio.php

Ian Parry Scholarship. Deadline: July 5, 2019

Ian Parry was a photojournalist who died while on assignment for The Sunday Times during the Romanian revolution in 1989. He was just 24 years of age. Aidan Sullivan, then picture editor, and Ian’s friends and family created the Ian Parry Scholarship in order to build something positive from such a tragic death.

This years Ian Parry Scholarship is divided into two categories: The Sunday Times Award for Achievement and The Canon Award for Potential.

The entry criteria for both is the same and the judges will make their decisions based on the individual merits of the entries.

Entrants must submit a portfolio and a clear proposal of a project they would undertake if they won the scholarship.

There is no entry fee.

Benefits include:

  • Each winner will receive $3,500 towards their chosen project.
  • Canon Europe continues to support the Scholarship and loans equipment to the winners.
  • Attend a portfolio review day with leading industry experts in London.
  • Mentorship Programme, we offer a year-long personal Mentorship to the winner of The Canon Award for Potential. The 2019 mentor is former Ian Parry Award recipient and highly respected Magnum photographer Jonas Bendiksen.
  • The winner of The Canon Award for Potential will have the opportunity to take part in the Transmissions Programme at Visa Pour L’Image in Perpignan.
  • World Press Photo, automatically accepts the winner of the Achievement Award into its final list of nominees for the Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam.
  • Your work will appear in The Sunday Times Magazine, our media sponsor.
  • Anyone who enters the 2019 scholarship will be eligible to join us for a portfolio review day in London with leading industry experts.

 

To enter this year’s Ian Parry Scholarship, you will need to meet the following entry criteria:
1)      A covering letter including your name, date of birth, permanent address, personal email address, personal telephone number, and if applicable, college, course title and course tutor.
2)      A detailed project proposal explaining your proposed project to us and outlining what the $3500 would enable you to shoot. It should be noted that this written section is considered extremely important. The judges will need to be impressed by your ability to produce a convincing project proposal as well as your photography skills.
3)      A portfolio of 12 (low resolution) photographs, either a photo essay or individual photos.
4)      Extended captions  for each image as a word document.
Please follow the instructions on our submit form carefully.

Entries must be received by the 5th of July 2019 

For details go to www.ianparry.org 

 

KAUNAS PHOTO Open Call. Deadline: July 12, 2019

KAUNAS PHOTO is the longest-running annual photographic festival in the Baltic States, based in Kaunas, Lithuania, since 2004. Maintaining its strong international character, KAUNAS PHOTO is a platform of premieres of emerging talents.
KAUNAS PHOTO festival announces an Open Call for its 16th edition, inviting photographers to propose their works and offering exhibiting opportunities as well as participation at New KAUNAS PHOTO STAR Award, consisting of a solo exhibition at the largest photography gallery in the Baltic States, Kaunas Photography Gallery and a 2500 EUR monetary prize.
KAUNAS PHOTO festival opening events will start on September 5 and 6, 2019.

More info:
http://festival.kaunasphoto.com/kaunas-photo-2019-open-call-kaunas-photo-star-award/

Link for submitting entries:
https://www.lensculture.com/competitions/kaunas-2019/events
Funded by:
Lietuvos kultūros taryba

In partnership with:
LensCulture
Kaunas Gallery