Category Archives: New & Noteworthy

Take a break from Corona Madness

Dear friends and mates.

In these difficult times of trouble and confusion, your captain and humble servant would like to help you steer the right course.

First, allow me to forward you a personal greeting to the Coronavirus, from my First Officers.

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corona_greeting

Please note: if you see this in your email and the video does not show, please go to the post.

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Thanks for watching.

 

Now, here are some resources for artists and people who work in the creative industries. Many of them were collected by others, which we thankfully credit. Please be in solidarity and pass them on to anybody who might need them.

If you would like to add to this list, please drop me a line (as a comment at the end of this message).

Ahoi Corona Virus and let’s keep going, my friends.

 

Your Captain.

 

@massisolation

Inspired by the 1937 Mass Observation project FORMAT is inviting you to join in the @MassIsolation project, a visual record of the Covid 19 Crisis on Instagram.

Share your experience of this global pandemic and send us your photographs, drawings, memes, tips and ideas. Become part of this important visual archive at a most extraordinary moment in our history.

It is free to take part and open to all across the world.

To join in on instagram send your your submissions to @massisolation and be sure to tag your images with #massisolation and #massisolationFORMAT.

Posts will also be shared by guest curators on the @FORMATfestival Instagram stream.

This important international visual archive is being organised in a partnership between FORMAT and The Gallery of Photography Ireland’s own project @mass_isolation_IRL, #massisolationIRL.

 

 

Emergency Grants for Artists – by https://www.artworkarchive.com

GRANTS IN THE UNITED STATES

Adolph & Esther Gottlieb Emergency Grant:

Intended to provide interim financial assistance to qualified, mature visual artists whose needs are the result of an unforeseen, catastrophic incident, and who lack the resources to meet that situation. The maximum amount of this grant is $15,000; an award of $5,000 is typical. To quality, you must be a visual artists (music, theater, dance, and writing are not covered by this grant) working professionally in a mature phase of your career for at least ten years.

CERF+ (Craft Emergency Relief Fund)

CERF+ provides rapid relief and career recovery loans through their own grants (for artists working in craft disciplines) as well as a list of emergency resources for artists in other disciplines. Additionally, CERF+ just launched the COVID-19 Response Fund to support artists working in craft disciplines. “This fund is essential to our rapid and effective response to those artists who are suffering severe health impacts from the coronavirus, ensuring that CERF+ has the funds necessary to respond to this unprecedented crisis,” said CERF in an email release. If you are able, please donate to the CERF+ COVID-19 Response Fund.

Artists’ Charitable Fund

Colorado-based Artists’ Charitable Fund assists American visual fine artists (painters and sculptors) living anywhere in the United States by paying a portion of their medical/dental/eye-care bills. For example, the Fund has purchased a wheelchair, paid for eye surgery, provided funding for an artificial leg, paid partial medical expenses of several artists who have cancer, as well as other needs for medical assistance. You can find out more about the fund as well as donate here.

Artists’ Fellowship, Inc.

The Artists’ Fellowship provides emergency aid to professional fine artists and their families in times of sickness, natural disaster, bereavement or unexpected extreme hardship.

The organization defines eligibility to “Professional” is defined as those visual artists who make their livelihood through sales as reported on a Schedule C with a U.S. Federal tax return. An active exhibition history is also an important part of documenting “professional.” You can find the application here.

Foundation for Contemporary Arts Emergency Grant

Emergency Grants offers immediate assistance to artists that have sudden, unanticipated opportunities to present their work to the public when there is insufficient time to seek other sources of funding. Artists should be living and working anywhere in the United States, though projects can occur in the U.S. and abroad.

Each month FCA receives an average of 95 Emergency Grant applications and makes approximately 12-15 grants. Grants range in amount from $500 to $2,500, and the average grant is now $1,600.

These grants do not cover life-related emergencies such as food, rent, medical bills, childcare, and other basic necessities, reimbursement for expenses that you have already incurred, or projects with no scheduled exhibition or performance dates, so look closely at the requirements and limitations.

Foundation for Contemporary Arts 

The Foundation will disburse $1,000 grants to artists who have had performances or exhibitions canceled or postponed because of the COVID-19 virus.

American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA) Relief Fund– (USA)

Any AGMA member in good standing is entitled and encouraged to apply for financial assistance through the AGMA Relief Fund. Grants are awarded on a case-by-case basis, based on need.

Haven Foundation

The Haven Foundation provides financial assistance up to  $10,000 to artists who have a health crisis; grants are one-year, and the financial amount provided is to the discretion of the Foundation. Grants can be renewed up to four more years, with a supplemental application. Read the guidelines for application here.

Rauschenberg Emergency Grants

The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation partnered to offer a new medical emergency aid program for artists. The one-time Rauschenberg Emergency Grants will provide visual and media artists and choreographers with up to $5,000 to cover a number of unforeseen medical expenses. There is no deadline; applications will be accepted and reviewed by the panel on a monthly basis beginning in late May/early June 2020.

National Coalition for Arts’ Preparedness & Emergency Response (NCAPER)

NCAPER is a voluntary task force of national, regional, state, and local arts organizations, public agencies, and foundations, NCAPER helps ensure that artists, arts/cultural organizations, cultural funders, and arts businesses have the capacity and ability to respond effectively to disasters and emergencies affecting the arts and culture sector.

Sustainable Arts Foundation
Awards supporting artists and writers with families with up to $6,000.

Equal Sound Corona Relief Fund

If you are a musician who has lost income due to a canceled gig as a result of the Coronavirus / Covid-19 outbreak, this new grant provides monetary support to musicians who have lost income due to a canceled gig as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Anonymous Was a Woman Relief Grants

This grant allows women-identifying artists to apply for up to $2,500 for financial hardships from loss of income or opportunity as a direct result of the crisis. The application opens April 6.

Arts and Culture Leaders of Color Emergency Fund

This emergency fund can provide up to $200 for people of color that are either working artist or art administration and are affected by COVID-19.

The Creator Fund

ConvertKit has established a fund to help creators in need during the COVID-19 pandemic. They have already received more applications than they have funding, but encourage creators to still apply.

Kinkade Family Foundation Emergency Grant for Curators

This emergency grant provides funding for a curatorial project that sheds light on the world during this time of darkness. Priority will be given to curators who have a venue secured for their project and are greatly impacted by the challenges we are facing due to COVID-19.

The Photographer Fund

Format has put together a $25,000 relief fund designed to help photographers facing financial difficulties during the outbreak. The fund offers $500 per person.

Art Interrupted Emergency Arts Fund

Twenty Summer launched an emergency fund for artists and arts organizations suffering from unexpected and unmanageable financial loss as a result of the COVID-19. Artists can receive up to $500, while arts organizations can receive up to $1,000.

Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council 

The Emergency Fund for Artists will now provide up to $500 in assistance to artists experiencing loss of income due to the coronavirus outbreak. The Emergency Fund also remains available for other unforeseen emergencies that may impact your ability to work, such as flood, theft, or fire.

 

UNITED STATES GRANTS BY REGION

Boston Artist Relief Fund

The Boston Artist Relief Fund will award grants of $500 and $1000 to individual artists who live in Boston whose creative practices and incomes are being adversely impacted by Coronavirus. The application opens Monday, March 16.

Chicago Theater Workers Relief Fund

Chicago area theater professionals may apply for a grant of up to $500 on a first-come-first-served basis.

Biscotto-Miller Theater Workers Fund

This fund provides emergency assistance for any member of the Chicago theater community who is dealing with serious medical issues, including those that may result from COVID-19 infection.

Dallas Low Income Artist Fund

This fund provides support for low-income, BIPOC, trans, gender non-conforming, and queer artists and freelancers whose livelihoods are being affected by the pandemic in Dallas.

Durham Artist Relief Fund

Artists, arts presenters or arts venues in need of funds due to COVID-19 can apply for funding.

Hawaii Artists and Entertainment Fund

Working artists in the Hawaii area in need of assistance due to COVID-19 can apply.

Indy Arts & Culture COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund

This relief fund was created for individuals working in the Indianapolis arts sector and impacted by the current public health crisis.

Arts Emergency Relief Fund

Emergency relief grants to City of Los Angeles-based dance, music, and theater artists, as well as small ensembles who have had their public performances, shows, or concerts cancelled.

Oolite Arts Relief Fund

This relief fund offers up to $500 to cover lost income due to COVID-19 to Miami-based Artists.

Springboard for the Arts Emergency Relief Fund

This relief fund supports artists in Minnesota who experience career-threatening emergencies, expanded to include emergencies related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Artists can request up to $500 to compensate for cancelled work that was scheduled and lost.

The Mayer Foundation grant 

The Mayer Foundation grant provides economic relief to New York artists who are distressed or suffering from lack of financial resources as a result of natural or civil disasters, or from temporary impoverishment, loss of employment, death or incapacity of a family wage earner or damage to home and property. The grant also provides healthcare to those who cannot afford it or whose health insurance or financial resources are insufficient to cover their medical needs. The grant is up to $2,500 and is reviewed on a quarterly basis.

NYC Community Trust COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund

The NYC COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund was created to aid nonprofit service providers struggling with the health and economic effects of the coronavirus

NYC Dancers Relief Fund

This fund offers urgent relief to freelance dance artists who have suffered financial losses due to the spread of the COVID-19 and the government enforced social restrictions.

North Carolina Artist Relief Fund

This fund has been created to support creative individuals who have been financially impacted by gig cancellations due to the outbreak of COVID-19. Artists and arts presenters in North Carolina can apply for emergency funding.

Philadelphia Performing Artists’ Emergency Fund

This fund was created to assist performing artists whose income has been impacted by show cancellations, slowing ticket sales, or low turnout during this pandemic.

Portland Area Artist Relief Emergency Fund

This fund is currently for freelance and independent artists residing in the Portland tri-county area.

San Francisco Arts and Artists Relief Fund

This emergency relief fund has been set up to help mitigate COVID-19 related financial losses that artists and small to mid-size arts and culture organizations have suffered. Individuals may apply for up to $2,000 and use the award however they see fit. Awards to organizations will range up to $25,000 and will be scaled based on budget size, up to $2 million.

San Francisco Foundation Emergency Response Fund for Nonprofits

SFF will make a limited number of one-time grants between $3,000 and $25,000 to nonprofits that are addressing the following four issue areas, described in greater detail below: racial bias, worker protection, homelessness and renter protection/housing security, and food security.

Performing Arts Worker Relief Fund

This is a resource for performing arts workers in the Bay Area who are facing a loss of income due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

UNTITLED, ART Emergency Fund

Artists who live in the Bay Area for the past two years are eligible for $250 in an effort to support the security and protection of artists who, in “normal times,” hold part-time or contract work to prioritize their art practice.

4Culture Relief Fund

This relief fund will distribute $1 million to artists in the Kings County, Washington, area who are affected by closures, cancellations, and loss of work due to COVID-19.

Creative Industry Relief Fund

This creative industry relief fund helps support musicians, artists, performers and filmmakers in the Tarrant County area in Texas who have lost work due to COVID-19.

Artist Trust Relief Fund

This relief fund provides rapid response grants supporting critical needs of artists in Washington state whose livelihoods have been impacted by COVID-19.

Washington Theatre Guide Taking Care Fund

Any theater professional currently residing in and who has actively worked in the Washington metropolitan area within the past two years is eligible to apply for emergency relief.

Seattle Artist’s Relief Fund

The Seattle Artist’s Relief Fund is a crowd-sourced financial relief fund that is already distributing financial relief to artists in the Seattle area. The GoFundMe campaign has reached $144,000 in just its first week and has already received 600 applications. This fund is for individual artists only who live in the greater Seattle area, not organizations or nonprofits. Donate if you can and apply if you need assistance.

Max’s Kansas City Project

Max’s Kansas City Project provides emergency funding and resources to professional artists in the creative arts who live in New York state. Grants of up to $1,000 are given to artists that demonstrate a financial need for medical aid, legal aid, or housing.

ArtsGreensboro

ArtsGreensboro has launched a relief fund for artists in the Greater Greensboro NC area who have experienced a loss of income due to the COVID-19 pandemic. You can apply or donate to the fund here. One hundred percent of proceeds go directly to benefit local Greensboro artists.

Arrowhead Regional Arts Council

This program provides grants of up to $750 for artists and organizations in Minnesota to do art projects online or in other forms during the current shutdown of arts venues. This grant is for artists and organizations who have had projects cancelled or postponed due to COVID-19.

Charlottesville Emergency Relief Fund 

Artists can request up to $300 to compensate for scheduled work that was scheduled and lost. Artists are eligible to apply for loss of income regardless of whether the income was from art or other jobs. Artists must live in the Charlottesville area including the city of Charlottesville or the counties of Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, or Nelson.

Denver Arts & Venues: IMAGINE 2020 Artist Assistance Fund 

This fund was started to support individual artists who are experiencing immediate, unforeseen emergency needs due to COVID-19.

Through the IMAGINE 2020 Artist Assistance Fund, Denver Arts & Venues has allocated $130,000 towards grants of up to $1,000 to individual artists who live in Denver whose incomes are being adversely affected due to cancellation of events, classes, performances, and other creative work.

INTERNATIONAL GRANTS

Artist + Activist Relief Fund 

This fund, created by The Soze Foundation, TaskForce and Invisible Hand, will support artists and activists whose work has been impacted by COVID-19. We will be making $250 grants to selected applicants on an on-going basis.

 

GRANTS IN CANADA

National Arts Center and Facebook Canada

The Facebook-National Arts Centre Fund for Performing Artists will provide $100,000 in artists fees to support online performances between now and March 31, 2020, to help ease financial strain for those impacted by the closure of performance venues across Canada related to COVID-19.

National Theater School of Canada

The National Theatre School of Canada (NTS) is allocating $60,000 in support of emerging artists (as 80 grants of $750). These funds will be granted to theatre artists in training, or artists who have completed a theatre training program within the past five years, to present a piece of art online.

Canada Council Funding and Support for Artists

The Canadian government is offering a variety of support to artists who are affected by Coronavirus. For Canadian artists abroad there is a travel fund for artists to return to Canada. There are also Emergency Care Benefits for artists unable to earn money due to Coronavirus.

EUROPEAN GRANTS

The Flanders Agency

The Flanders Agency for Innovation and Entrepreneurship is working to provide monthly stipends for self-employed people who are not able to work during Coronavirus. This monthly benefit is € 1,291.69 without family expenses and € 1,614.10 with family expenses during the months of March and April.

Kone Foundation 

The Kone Foundation is offering an at-home artist in a residency support program to fund artists over a three month period. Monthly funds range by artist experience, €2,400 (early career), €2,800 (mid-career), and €3,500 (experienced artist).

The Swedish Cultural Foundation and the Swedish Association in Finland

The Swedish Cultural Foundation and the Swedish Association for the Arts have each decided to direct € 200,000 to the new grant form “Culture in the meantime”. In the spring, a total of € 400,000 will be distributed for art practitioners and cultural workers who are hit hard financially by the corona crisis.

The Civic Theater Ireland

The Civic Theater has created a fund to provide financial relief to Irish artists experiencing lost income related to COVID-19. Small grants of up to €500 will be paid rapidly on a first-come, first-served basis to affected artists and groups.

 

GRANTS IN THE UK

Arts Council of England

The Arts Council of England is providing £160 million of emergency funding available for those organizations and individuals who will need it during this crisis. The council is also making £20 million of financial support available to individuals ( artists, creative practitioners, and freelancers), so they can better sustain themselves, and their work, in the coming months.

South West Creatives – Corona Virus Impact Fund – (Bristol, England) 

Aiming to provide ten £200 hardship funds for any artists, practitioners and creative freelancers that cannot work during this time or who have been affected by cancellations or other impacts.

GRANTS IN ASIA

The Hong Kong Arts Development Council

The Hong Kong Arts Development Council is funding 150 million HK Dollars to subsidize arts organizations, groups, and practitioners having work from February to April impacted by COVID-19. This funding includes performances, exhibitions, rehearsals, preparation and post-event work.

Singapore Unbound Relief Fund (SURF) 

Creative writers, whether they are Singapore citizens living anywhere in the world or Permanent Residents of Singapore, may apply for a USD200/SGD280 grant from SURF with no strings attached. This fund is specifically intended to help those in dire need of immediate help.

Other ressources

 

The Luminary announces the Futures Fund: Emergency Relief Grant for Artists

The Luminary, in partnership with the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, is offering immediate artist emergency grants of at least $60,000 for artists and arts organizers in the St. Louis region. Drawing from a total grant of $100,000 to support our Futures Fund regranting initiative and related activities, the Warhol Foundation has authorized diverting funds for 2020 to support the direct needs of those in our community most impacted by COVID-19.

Artist and arts organizers are among those hit the hardest not just by the arrival of the coronavirus, but by the unpredictable effects of the closure of art spaces, suspended teaching engagements, cancelled commissions, exhibitions, and events of all kinds, not to mention the many contract and service jobs lost that sustain many artistic practices. The Futures Fund: Emergency Relief for Artists grant is meant as a small intervention and expression of solidarity and support; we wish to stitch together enough support for now so that there is a horizon for us to live into.

The Futures Fund will offer no fewer than sixty $1,000 grants over two cycles in April and June. Applicants are not required to use funds for a project: these unrestricted $1,000 grants may be used for shelter, food, seeds, childcare, communal care — whatever makes life possible for these uncertain months.
For more information and to apply, please visit http://theluminaryarts.com/programs/futures-fund
If individuals and businesses would like to support this fund to extend its impact, tax-deductible donations may be made online or by cash or check to The Luminary at 2701 Cherokee Street, St. Louis, MO 63118. All contributions received will be given directly to artists in our region impacted by COVID-19 and its related economic fallout.

The Futures Fund is created and administered by The Luminary as a partner in the Regional Regranting Program of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The Futures Fund is one of 16 Regranting programs, which have funded 1,000 projects around the nation with grants close to $10,000,000. The full list of 16 Regranting cities includes: Albuquerque, Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, Denver, Houston, Kansas City, Miami, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Portland (ME), Portland (OR), Saint Louis, San Francisco and Washington DC.

 

Summer Special: Meet the Captain.

As a special delight for the hot season, we are happy to serve you a freshly squeezed summer cocktail on deck, with the Captain of this vessel. Please enjoy

“Moritz Neumüller in conversation with Inanna Riccardi” 

An in-depth and yet easy-going interview conducted by the Italian researcher Inanna Riccardi with curator, educator and writer Moritz Neumüller, on museums in the age of participation, the relationship of photography with visual culture, and the role of technology for making art more accessible to all.

 

 

Inanna Riccardi: From looking at your website and onthe internet, one gets the impression that your career has involved a lot of Do-it-yourself initiatives. How would you describe this process?

 

I am trained as an art historian, I studied Art History and then Economics in two different universities and am specialized in photography, which happened almost by chance. People quite often ask if I’m a photographer, but I’m not!

 

I think this is because, until recently, there was no photographic education apart from becoming a photographer, so photographers turned their professionalskills to curatorship or as experts working within the museum world. In my case, I had to cultivate my interest in photography mostly through self-study. That started with me being a research assistant at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. It was during my PhD studies, and I spent one day per week in the photo department. During my time there I learnt a lot! They offered me a job afterwards but I decided to go back to Austria to finish my PhD, hoping to be able to work at MoMA later on.

 

IR: MoMA is definitely a great place to learn, but then9/11 happened. How did it affect your progress?

 

Going back to New York wasn’t really an option anymore: MoMA relies heavily on private donations andafter 9/11 these donations decreased, partly because everybody donated to the firemen. That meant that the museum had to lay off part of their staff, and the foreigners were the first ones to go. I therefore had to re-think my plans for the future.

I had always wanted to see Cuba before it changed and I always wanted to go there not as a tourist but to live. So I got in touch with the photographic museum, the FotoTeca, and proposed a project about Afro-Cuban culture and heritage, in particular Santeria.

 

IR: That’s a very anthropological topic, funnily enoughsuggested by an outsider. Was it the first time someone suggested the topic?

 

Yes, in fact there had never been a photographic exhibition about Santeria. That was due to political reasons: for many years religious practices were forbidden or not really looked at, while photography had a very important social and political role, as a sort of‘propaganda’. Photographs were used to show the achievements of the government and the new revolutionary state.

My first curatorial project, as you said, was only half on photography and the other half was on anthropology. I therefore asked my cousin, who is an anthropologist and filmmaker, to help me. As a result of this collaboration we created a documentary film and a book. That was kind of a big project for someone who had just started! But everything I learnt was by doing, by finding out for myself. I made a lot of mistakes and I asked for help a lot.

 

 

 

IR: So Latin American photography seems to have drawn you to live in Spain…

 

In a way, I guess you are right. After that experience, I found myself in Madrid, and by chance I started working on an exhibition on Latin American photography.

We worked on this project for a year. It was shown in Barcelona and Madrid at the same time and that was interesting for me, I think it was the first time I’d heard that one exhibition could be shown in two places. Only afterwards did I find out that the “Family of Man” exhibition did the same thing in the 50s and 60s. Then I worked at Photo España, Spanish’s bigger photo festival. After that I moved to Barcelona, ten years ago, and I have been working as a freelancer since then.

In recent years I have been specializing in photobooks and my other field of specialization is accessibility to art.

 

IR: It’s interesting that you mention accessibility, in a world where inequality and the subsequent access to resources is discussed. How can museums and art institutions in general switch the static power relationship among the audience and create more equal conditions?  

 

Historically museums have fostered a sort of devotion and reverence towards the artwork and the artists. If we think about the structure of the building, most museums are located at the top of steps, they resemble Roman and Greek temples, so the audience has to climb up to the altar to worship the artworks.

However, I think museums should be generating new practices for looking at society. In this regard, big institutions such MoMA have been pioneers.

I was working at MoMA when I saw, for the first time, a tour for blind people, which consisted in them touching some sculptures. Everyone in the group of participants had a smile from ear to ear, they felt that they were part of the art.

That made a big impression on me and influenced my way of working.

Within this context digital developments can help museums to open their doors and become more inclusive.

I am thinking of Smartify, for example, which is an app that uses image recognition to retrieve information about the artwork.

 

IR: Technology, at its extreme, seems, in some museums, to have become the only alternative to the accepted way of exhibiting. I refer to the increasing attention given toVirtual Reality. However, I believe that there is the need for creating more inclusive practices for curating, which take into account different perceptions and experiences of the world and value them, maybe to the point of generating ad hoc projects for specific target groups.

 

I investigate these alternatives with “ArteConTacto”(which can be translated as Art with Touch, or Art Contact), a project and a platform which aims at providing a sensorial experience of the art by using allthe senses like touch, hearing… The idea that lies behind it is to make art accessible to everybody!

“ArteConTacto” adapts exhibitions for people who are normally excluded from the art. The strategy is to include fragile or excluded groups from day one, by using technology to our advantage, to bridge the gaps between the material and the audience.

In 2009 I used 3D printing and tactile materials for the first time as a tool to adapt an exhibition for blind people. One piece we adapted was an untitled photograph by Lotte Hendrich-Hassmann from 1982, which was taken during a performance. The picture represents the artist covered by some sort of cloth, which is wrapped all around the body. We made a full-body scan of a person in the same posture and had it printed at the Technological University of Vienna, in a 3D sculpture of approx. 30 cm high. In this way the blind could actually touch the piece. The most interesting part was taking something out of the frame and placing it in the space so people could use it.

 

IR: Have you have tried to work outside the European context?

 

In Tunisia I did another interesting project: I contacted people from the association for the blind and asked them,what would you like to see, if you could see? And some people said a certain building in the city, someone said a plane, someone else said a mosque. I asked them if they knew how to get to these places, and they said yes, more or less. I asked them if they had ever had a tactile map of the city, and since they had never had one I created it for them. I took a map of the city, glued it to a board and made the big streets with transparent glue. I gave it to them and they had the first tactile plan of the city.

One of the participants said he wanted to visit the football stadium, so we went there. He walked to the goal because he was very interested in experiencing the distance between the penalty spot and the goal he knew about it and wanted to experience it for himself. We produced models of the buildings they were interested in. We went to the shoemaker at the bazar and we designed the airplane, for example, on the rubber material he uses for making sandals. Then we placed the cut out on a board. The process was similar for the mosque and other important buildings.

Back at home, we also made a tactile photograph of one of the other buildings and sent it to Tunisia. It was exhibited and then donated to blind’s association.

 

IR: Being an Austrian living in Barcelona and working within the European and extra-European contexts, you could be seen as a good example of the embodiment of different cultures and different ways of working. Howdoes this personal aspect play a role in your practice as a curator?

 

I think art is a very culturally framed concept. For example, a huge part of the population has a different opinion about what art should be compared to people who work within the field. I am referring to cultural products, which can be considered points of interest or tools of interaction for and with somebody.

 

IR: It seems that you particularly enjoy working with and for blind people, who have a completely different understanding of and approach to art…

 

They are an interesting case study from my perspective: I was trained as a visual person in visual culture, but they do not have access to that aspect, so there is a big gap.

In addition I go to museums all the time, since it is partof my job, so it’s also partly a duty for me.

Blind people, instead, are generally afraid to go to museums because they feel they do not belong there, that there is nothing for them, that they will feel stupid.

I am interested in the art and its story, while blind people are generally interested in many aspects of an art experience, such as the materiality of sculpture, or the exhibition space itself, or the way you are able to communicate the story around, behind or about an artwork. They also spend longer time experiencing each artwork compared to the general public.

 

IR: They experience art in a pre-consumer society way, so we can we can learn a lot from their way of approaching art.

 

That’s the reason why I’m so interested in “special” target groups. My projects are always a give and take, learn and teach. And as a by-product, everybody experiences something new and they enjoy themselvesthrough art.

 

IR: Art for everybody, without simplification and reduction, is an aspiration that many institutions have. At the same time we see a more impatient and fragmented young generation, in which smartphones are playing a crucial role in connecting them to others who are physically distant but with whom they share similar interests.

 

I see technology and its use, mostly among youngsters,as an opportunity to invite people in and get more out of the art, instead of obstructing the art experience.

It’s all about how to use what’s out there, and how to navigate the generational changes in an efficient way for museums.

For example, the younger generation also has a tendency not to listen during guided tours in the museum, but they listen to their phones and they look at their phones, so if you have the chance to use that technology you can reach those were previously unreachable.

I think technology can be used to open the cultural field and reach new audiences.

 

IR: However, you must admit that technology also has a negative side, like cinemas loosing their audience because of Netflix.

 

That’s true but we can’t stop time, meaning technological progress. However, these people are still looking at something that can be considered a cultural product.

That opens the discussion about what and how products become cultural and where the line is that marks that difference. If we include these other new cultural products in the pallet of things that you can do, engage with, then culture has not lost anyone. People are now becoming DJs and VJs for their own homes, their community, their followers, and they are much more active in that sense than people who grew up with unidirectional mass media such as TV. Maybe younger generations are even more engaged, more educated, more adult users of technology and cultural products.

 

IR: Another excluded target group is the elderly, who probably have difficulties relating to technology and might be more interested in conventional exhibitions. How can technology tackle these issues?

 

Technology applied to generate tactile reliefs and 3Dprinting are definitely big resources for including this group. With age, most people begin losing their senses, and have impaired vision, so they can only see somethings. Therefore, multi-sensorial experiences, which include for example listening to a story, are an interesting way of including this audience.

At the same time, they do not need to understand the technological process behind the experience.  

Moreover, I see this group as a source of inspiration: they love to tell stories, for example about the war they foughtin, an experience which many of us haven’t had. In that way they can still relate to and meet our art experience with their experience.

 

IR: Talking about technology as a tool of inclusion rather than exclusion, the internet has definitely created a revolutionary way of gathering information, and has brought part of our world closer. How have you used this potential in your practice?

 

In 2010 I created The Curator Ship”, which was generated out of necessity to filter and share information that reached me about opportunities for artists and curators.

I used to get a lot of emails about grants, residencies, exhibition proposals, portfolio reviews, calls for participation, and so on, which I forwarded to the people in my network who I thought might be interested in them.

But it came to a point where it took up too much of my time, so I decided to put it on a website so that everybody knows what I know.

 

I filter what I receive by email and I select what I find interesting enough for me. Moreover, when the initiative is open for international applicants but in only in one language, I translate it and put it up there as the call: here is the summary in English and the description, and it says it’s open so you can apply just by running it through Google translate.

Then people can apply, it doesn’t say anywhere it has to be in a certain language, so just send your stuff in English. I guess I have in this way opened many opportunities for the international public.

 

IR: It seems to me that you are a many-faceted professional within the art scene, who tries to learn everything he can and wears several hats! Where and how is your energy mostly used these days?  

 

My contribution is that I know nearly nothing about everything, and I’ve always tried to be the one in the room who knows the least so I can learn the most.

You cannot really get famous with that kind of thing, you get more famous and wealthy if you do one thing and you do it really well. But I am happily accepting this. Whenever I’ve had too much of something I’ve backed out and done something else, or tried to do many things at the same time.

 

I work with some mediums that interest me a lot: performance, video, photography, photobooks, filmmaking, documentary. I think that what they have in common is this strange relationship to the world outside, if you want to call it the real world, even if these days it’s becoming more and more unreal and surreal. But these kinds of reflections on the world, on themes that surround us, in this kind of dialogue with what is going on out there, is what interests me, when I curate, when I teach, when I write and when I do projects!

This interview was performed via skype on 22.11.2018

 

8th Edition of the European Master of Contemporary Photography. Deadline: April 22, 2019

What do Martina Zanin (featured recently in YET Magazine and currently on view at Leporello in Rome) and Sofía Ayarzagoitia (First Prize at the xvii Bienal de la Fotografía, Mexico City, photobook published by La Fábrica, Madrid) have in common?

They both studied at the European Master of Contemporary Photography at IED Madrid. And so did Jorge, Dimitri, Anna, Eoin, Wawi, Joachim, Dahlia, Duarte, Yutaka, Paula, and Alena (only to name a few, and not two of them coming from the same country, by the way).

Their first-hand experience with some of the best artists, editors, curators and scholars in the field of contemporary photography has helped them to develop their own visual language and bring their work to the next level.

Faculty includes Martin Parr, Joan Fontcuberta, Irina ChmyrevaSimon Roberts, Mireia Sallarès, and Andreas Müller-Pohle. Project tutors: Nicolás Combarro and Ricardo Cases, together with course director, Moritz Neumüller. Students come from around the globe, classes are held in English. The next edition of the European Master of Contemporary Photography in Madrid starts April 22nd, 2019.

iedphotography.com

 

PDF Guides for emerging photographers.

Free downloads, Courtesy of Bromide Books: three guides for emerging photographers. 

Job openings at FORMAT Festival

JOBS AT FORMAT

FORMAT are delighted to announce a number of part time and short term contract positions to work with the FORMAT team to help deliver the next edition of the festival in 2019.

So come and join our team by applying to one of the following roles.

FORMAT Marketing Assistant 
FORMAT Volunteer Coordinator
FORMAT Volunteer Coordinator Assistant 
FORMAT Portfolio Review Coordinator
FORMAT Parallel Curatorship Coordinator 

Apply Now


COMING SOON

East meets West Masterclass Programme

FORMAT, QUAD and GRAIN Projects are delighted to announce a new collaborative project that will provide twenty emerging artists and photographers currently residing in the Midlands with a professional development opportunity.

At the Masterclasses you will learn from industry leaders including photographers, curators, directors and producers about portfolio development and receive advice regarding competitions, commissions, exhibitions, funding, distribution and editing. The sessions will also discuss socially engaged, editorial and fine art photography and the photobook.

If you get this message in a bottle …

… it means that you have subscribed to the The Curator Ship at some point. Yes, this is the obligatory GDPR bullsh… I mean, bull’s eye.

The Curator Ship uses the WordPress blogging platform to post information for visual artists, curators and cultural agents. If you see this as a post on the blog, you can stop reading now and go back to creating art. Thanks and bye.

If you have received this in your email box and want to unsubscribe, please go to the left side of the blog (https://thecuratorship.wordpress.com), and scroll down to find information of how to manage your subscription.

If you want to know more on WordPress GDPR Guidelines, here is a (terribly boring) post on that:

https://www.codeinwp.com/blog/complete-wordpress-gdpr-guide/

Again: Your email address and when you subscribed to The Curator Ship is all the information WordPress let’s me know about you. I am given the option by WordPress to download a list of that as a csv file and send you individual emails. But I have not done that ever and will not do it. All I want to do is to post useful things on the platform, and those who have subscribed with their email will get it in their inbox.

That’s all the information I have and probably more than you need. Thanks anyway for reading this and now go back to doing cool projects, critical writing, curating great exhibitions, or whatever you do. I appreciate your time and hope you do the same with mine. Because this is a purely altruistic enterprise for the community I am part of. End of the story. If you still have questions, please write me an email to moritzbarcelona at g m a i l . c o m.

Attention: This message will self-destroy in 3 – 2 – 1 – Splash!!!!!

Transeurope Workshop Zagreb. March 17, 2018

Last places for Workshop Project development, from the idea to the final product, given by the very Captain of this ship, Moritz Neumüller, Inscription fee: 20 EURO (What?? YES!)

This hands-on seminar is addressed at artists working with visual narratives through any lens based media, wishing to learn more about the possibilities of publishing, exhibiting and other ideal opportunities for outputting work. Participants are requested to have a project completed or close to completion ready to be distributed, and they can expect to leave with a solid plan at the end of the seminar.

Inscription at

http://transeuropephoto.eu/activities/project-development-idea-final-product/

 

This workshop is part of Transeurope, a new European platform for professional photographers and visual artists to share, learn, interact and develop their work internationally. The scope of Transeurope is to facilitate access to professional opportunities as well as to create the conditions for greater transnational circulation of their works.

From January to March 2018, preparatory portfolio workshops are going to take place in 14 countries at international cultural and photography venues. Following on from this from May to June 2018, three portfolio reviews will be held in Madrid, Athens and Helsinki where more than 60 portfolio reviewers and 200 photographers/visual artists are expected to participate. The program will include seminars and workshops, conference and cultural visits shaping an experience of professional training for photographers.

After the closure of the portfolios, a jury will select 30 works that will be part of three group exhibitions (September 2018-November 2019) and will be also featured in the accompanying printed magazine/publication and the web platform will be a data base for consulting with more than 300 experts, artists and art centers, etc.

Transeurope is co-organized by the Fundacion Contemporanea-PhotoEspaña in Madrid, The Finnish museum of Photography in Helsinki and Euromare NPO in Athens. Among its founders the project has come to life with the support from the European Commission, the Creative Europe Culture-Educational, and the Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency.

For more information on how to participate, check out the website www.transeuropephoto.eu and the Transeurope Facebook page.